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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #317112

Research Project: Genetic Improvement and Virus Management of Small Fruit Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Trailing blackberry genotypes differ in yield and post-harvest fruit quality during establishment in an organic production system

Author
item Fernandez-salvador, Javier - Oregon State University
item Strik, Bernadine - Oregon State University
item Zhao, Yanyun - Oregon State University
item Finn, Chad

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/3/2014
Publication Date: 2/1/2015
Citation: Fernandez-Salvador, J., Strik, B.C., Zhao, Y., Finn, C.E. 2015. Trailing blackberry genotypes differ in yield and post-harvest fruit quality during establishment in an organic production system. HortScience. 50:240-246.

Interpretive Summary: The blackberry cultivars Obsidian, Black Diamond, Metolius, and Onyx and two advanced selections (ORUS 1939-4 and ORUS 2635-1) were evaluated for their commercial fresh market potential during the establishment years of an organic production system. The planting was established in spring 2010 using approved practices for organic production and was certified organic in 2012, the first fruiting year. Plants were irrigated using a drip line under a woven polyethylene ground cover (weed mat) installed for weed management. Liquid fertilizers injected through the drip system were used at a rates of 56 kg•ha–1 total N in 2011-2012 and 90 kg•ha–1 total N in 2013. Genotypes differed in the level of nutrients measured in primocane leaves. Tissue P, K, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn concentrations were within the recommended standards, but tissue Ca, Mg, and B were deficient in some or all of the selections and cultivars. While 'Obsidian', 'Black Diamond' and both advanced selections responded well in terms of plant growth and yield to the organic production system used, yields in ‘Onyx’ and ‘Metolius’ were considered low for commercial production. In contrast, the higher yielding ‘Obsidian’ and ORUS-2635-1 appeared to be the best suited for organic fresh market production due to larger fruit size, greater fruit firmness, higher sugar to acid ratios, lower post-harvest percent moisture loss in ORUS-2635-1) and the longest number of marketable storage days at 5 C in ‘Obsidian’.

Technical Abstract: Four blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus Watson) cultivars (‘Obsidian’, ‘Black Diamond’, ‘Metolius’, ‘Onyx’) and two advanced selections (ORUS 1939-4 and ORUS 2635-1) were evaluated during the establishment years of an organic production system for fresh market. The planting was established in spring 2010 using approved practices for organic production and was certified organic in 2012, the first fruiting year. Plants were irrigated using a drip line under a woven polyethylene ground cover (weed mat) installed for weed management. Liquid fertilizers injected through the drip system were used at a rates of 56 kg•ha–1 total N in 2011-2012 and 90 kg•ha–1 total N in 2013. Genotypes differed in the level of nutrients measured in primocane leaves. Tissue P, K, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn concentrations were within the recommended standards, but tissue Ca, Mg, and B were deficient in some or all genotypes. While two cultivars and both advanced selections responded well in terms of plant growth and yield to the organic production system used, yields in ‘Onyx’ and ‘Metolius’ were considered low for commercial production. In contrast, the higher yielding ‘Obsidian’ and ORUS-2635-1 appeared to be the best suited for organic fresh market production due to larger fruit size, greater fruit firmness, higher sugar to acid ratios, lower post-harvest percent moisture loss in ORUS-2635-1), and the longest number of marketable storage days at 5 C in ‘Obsidian’.