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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Byron, Georgia » Fruit and Tree Nut Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316465

Research Project: Breeding Stone Fruit Adapted to the Production Environment of the Southeastern United States

Location: Fruit and Tree Nut Research

Title: Pigments in fruits and vegetables: genomics and dietetics

Author
item Chen, Chunxian

Submitted to: Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables: Genomics and Dietetics
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/8/2014
Publication Date: 4/9/2015
Publication URL: http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9781493923557
Citation: Chen, C. 2015. Pigments in fruits and vegetables: genomics and dietetics. Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables: Genomics and Dietetics. 227 p.

Interpretive Summary: Biological pigments include chlorophylls for green colors and photosynthesis, and carotenoids, flavonoids, and betalains for non-green colors and diverse functions. These chemical components are able to generate a full spectrum of visual colors in nature, and are rich in fruits and vegetables that are ultimately ingested in our daily diet. Extensive research on pigment biosynthetic and genetic mechanisms has yielded insightful results over the past years. Potential nutritional and medicinal benefits of these pigments to human and animals have attracted nutritionists and clinical functional food researchers to study their health effects and encourage people to increase the daily consumption of pigment-rich fruits and vegetables. This book gives a comprehensive overview of biosynthetic genomics and preventive dietetics of carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains in general and in particular fruits and vegetables as well.

Technical Abstract: This comprehensive treatise provides a systemic and insightful overview of current advances in the biosynthetic genomics/genetics and preventive dietetics of carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains, from a general perspective, and in specific fruits and vegetables as well. Genomics/genetics focuses on what and how enzymatic and regulatory genes are involved in pigment biosynthesis. Dietetics emphasizes how these pigments contribute nutritional/medical benefits to health, prevent diseases, and act as potential nutraceuticals in the diet. The goal is to provide research scientists, nutrition specialists, healthy food advocates, students, and rainbow food (fruit and vegetable) lovers with an integrated resource on the biosynthetic and dietetic mechanisms of these pigments.