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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Florence, South Carolina » Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316404

Research Project: MANAGING WATER AVAILABILITY AND QUALITY TO MAINTAIN OR INCREASE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, CONSERVE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND ENHANCE ENVIRONMENT

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Assessing diversity and phytoremediation potential of mangroves for copper contaminated sediments in Subic Bay, Philippines

Author
item Paz-alberto, Annie - Central Luzon State University
item Sigua, Gilbert
item Vizmonte, Jose - Central Luzon State University

Submitted to: International Journal of Plant, Animal, and Environmental Sciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/17/2015
Publication Date: 12/16/2015
Citation: Paz-Alberto, A.M., Sigua, G.C., Vizmonte, J.L. 2015. Assessing diversity and phytoremediation potential of mangroves for copper contaminated sediments in Subic Bay, Philippines. International Journal of Plant, Animal, and Environmental Sciences. 5(4):50-59.

Interpretive Summary: The build-up of toxic pollutants in soil, water and sediments not only affects natural resources, but also causes a major strain on ecosystems. Interest in phytoremediation as a method to solve chemical contamination has been growing rapidly in recent years. The technology has been utilized to clean up soil and groundwater from heavy metals and other toxic organic compounds in many countries like the United States and Russia. Presently, there are few research findings on the phytoremediation potential of mangroves on metals like copper (Cu). The study was conducted to survey and identify mangroves present in Subic Bay, Philippines and to assess the phytoremediation potential of mangrove species on Cu in sediments. A total of five mangrove species were identified in the study area such as Barringtonia racemosa, Bruguiera specie (sp), Canophyllum inophyllum, Rhizophora apiculata and Sonneratia alba. The Species Diversity Index of the mangroves in the area indicated low diversity due to low species richness and uneven distribution of different species in the study area. Nonetheless, mangrove species in our study possessed the capacity to absorb Cu, potentially aiding in the retention of toxic material and thereby reducing transport of Cu to adjacent estuarine and marine ecosystem. Sonneratia alba, Barringtonia racemosa, Bruguiera sp. and Rhizophora apiculata are potential phytoremediators of Cu from contaminated sediments in mangrove ecosystems. Our results confirmed that mangroves thriving in marshy ecosystems have potential phytoremediation properties because they act as pollutant eradicators, which are critical for the protection of adjacent coastal ecosystems and nearby communities from the potential buildup of Cu in sediments at Subic Bay.

Technical Abstract: Toxic metal pollution of water and soil is a major environmental problem and most conventional remediation approaches may not provide adequate solutions. An alternative way of reducing copper (Cu) concentration from contaminated sediments is through phytoremediation. Presently, there are few research findings on the phytoremediation potential of mangroves on metals like Cu. The study was conducted to survey and identify mangroves present in Subic Bay, Philippines and to assess the phytoremediation potential of mangrove species on Cu in sediments. A total of five mangrove species were identified in the study area such as Barringtonia racemosa, Bruguiera sp, Canophyllum inophyllum, Rhizophora apiculata and Sonneratia alba. The Species Diversity Index of the mangroves in the area indicated low diversity due to low species richness and uneven distribution of different species in the study area. Nonetheless, mangrove species in our study possessed the capacity to absorb Cu, potentially aiding in the retention of toxic material and thereby reducing transport of Cu to adjacent estuarine and marine ecosystem. Sonneratia alba, Barringtonia racemosa, Bruguiera sp. and Rhizophora apiculata are potential phytoremediators of Cu from contaminated sediments in mangrove ecosystems.