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ARS Home » Midwest Area » East Lansing, Michigan » Sugarbeet and Bean Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316303

Research Project: Genetic Dissection of Traits for Sugar Beet Improvement

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Title: Comparative genomics approaches within Beta vulgaris to reveal loci relevant to root development and secondary metabolite storage traits

Author
item Galewski, Paul - Michigan State University
item Mcgrath, J Mitchell - Mitch

Submitted to: Annual Beet Sugar Development Foundation Research Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/15/2015
Publication Date: 6/1/2015
Citation: Galewski, P., McGrath, J.M. 2015. Comparative genomics approaches within Beta vulgaris to reveal loci relevant to root development and secondary metabolite storage traits. [CD-ROM] 2014 Annual Beet Sugar Development Foundation Research Report. Denver, Colorado: Beet Sugar Development Foundation.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Development and patterning of Beta vulgaris root tissues is key to obtaining a good crop. This study aims to undertake a comparative systems biology approach for the study of root development, physiology, and storage characteristics within two B. vulgaris crop types, sugar beet and red beet. Generating root development transcriptomes for two contrasting B. vulgaris crop types across a 10-week developmental series allows a framework to examine what influences development though variability in expression topologies, developmental programs, and gene co-expression clusters relative to developmental time, phenotypes, and genetic background. Currently, a developmental transcriptome for sugar beet variety C869 has been completed using the RNAseq approach. Transcripts resulting from the sequencing were aligned to the RefBeet-0.9 genome. Alignment, quantification of expression levels, and differential expression tests were accomplished using the bowtie pipeline. Genes were profiled across growth and development for 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10 weeks encompassing the putative phase transition around 5 weeks after germination. Interestingly, many of the genes aligned to the RefBeet genome with high expression across the 10-week developmental series were unidentified through sequence homology searches to other organisms. Lineage specific B. vulgaris genes may influence root development and secondary metabolite accumulation in beets.