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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316123

Research Project: Bio-Rational Approaches to Manage Insect Pests of Potato Crops

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: (Z)-11-hexadecenal attracts male Hecatera dysodea (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

Author
item Landolt, Peter
item Ream, Lee
item Cha, Dong

Submitted to: Journal of Kansas Entomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/24/2017
Publication Date: 7/1/2017
Citation: Landolt, P.J., Ream, L.J., Cha, D.H. 2017. (Z)-11-hexadecenal attracts male Hecatera dysodea (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).. Journal of Kansas Entomological Society. 89(3):283-286.

Interpretive Summary: Larvae of certain species of moths that can severely damage a number of agricultural crops, including vegetables. Pheromone-baited traps are used to detect and monitor the adult moths of these pests. Researchers at the USDA-ARS laboratory in Wapato, Washington developed a chemical attractant for the cutworm moth Hecatera dysodea that is introduced into the Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and infests lettuce. They determined that males of the moth can be captured in traps baited with the chemical (Z)-11-hexadecenal, which is probably the major component of the sex pheromone. They also determined that a one milligram dose of the chemical was suitable for a long lasting and effective lure. This information will be useful to entomologists, growers and pest managers who want to determine the presence of the moth, or to determine a need for pest control measures.

Technical Abstract: Larvae of certain species of moths that can severely damage a number of agricultural crops, including vegetables. Pheromone-baited traps are used to detect and monitor the adult moths of these pests. Researchers at the USDA-ARS laboratory in Wapato, Washington developed a chemical attractant for the cutworm moth Hecatera dysodea that is introduced into the Pacific Northwest of the U.S., and infests lettuce. They determined that males of the moth can be captured in traps baited with the chemical (Z)-11-hexadecenal, which is probably the major component of the sex pheromone. They also determined that a one milligram dose of the chemical was suitable for a long lasting and effective lure. This information will be useful to entomologists, growers and pest managers who want to determine the presence of the moth, or to determine a need for pest control measures.