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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Riverside, California » National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316120

Research Project: Management and Characterization of Citrus and Date Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus

Title: Development of a global conservation strategy for citrus genetic resources

Author
item ROOSE, M - University Of California
item GMITTER, F - University Of Florida
item Lee, Richard
item Hummer, Kim
item MACHADO, MARCOS - Sylvio Moreira Citrus Research
item ASHMORE, SARAH - Griffiths University
item DENG, XIUXIN - Huazhong Agricultural University
item ANCILLO, GEMA - Valencian Institute For Agricultural Research
item VIVES, MARI - Valencian Institute For Agricultural Research
item Volk, Gayle
item KAHN, TRACY - University Of California
item LURO, FRANCOIS - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/1/2013
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/60837
Citation: Roose, M. L., Gmitter F. G., Lee, R.F., Hummer, K.E., Machado, M., Ashmore, S., Deng, X., Ancillo, G., Vives, M.C., Volk, G.M., Kahn, T.L., Luro, F. 2015. Development of a global conservation strategy for citrus genetic resources. Acta Horticulture Proceedings. 1065:75-83.

Interpretive Summary: Citrus is one of the most widely cultivated fruit crops in the world. Its center of origin is in Southeast Asia, but it is cultivated in most areas with climates suitable for its production. Collections of genetic resources of citrus are necessary for the long-term security of this crop, and ex situ collections have been established in a number of countries. A global citrus germplasm network was established in 1997, but a global strategy is necessary for the long-term conservation of citrus genetic resources. A workshop was held at the Congress of the International Citrus Congress in Valencia, Spain, in November 2012. This publication summarizes the nine talks that were given at the workshop and summarizes recommendations that came out of the workshop. Among these recommendations was a survey of citrus genebanks throughout the world. The information gathered in this survey will be used to develop a long-term conservation strategy for citrus, which will be implemented through the Global Crop Diversity Trust with collaboration from the International Society for Horticultural Science and the international Citrus research community.

Technical Abstract: Citrus is an economically important world tree fruit crop with production in more than 146 countries. The center of origin for citrus is considered to be Southeastern Asia including southern China, northeastern India, and Malaysia, with secondary centers in surrounding areas. Novel and commercially significant scion and rootstock cultivars originating by natural mutation or directed hybridization were introduced during the past century. Significant genetic resource collections exist in many countries. A global citrus germplasm network was developed in 1997. Now that the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGR) has recognized Citrus as an Annex 1 crop, a global conservation strategy needs to be established. The objective of this workshop was to plan the development of this strategy. More than 60 delegates attended with representation from Argentina, Australia, Bhutan, Brazil, China, Columbia, France, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, UAE, US, and Vietnam. Nine oral presentations were given describing multiple aspects of genebank operations, technologies and gaps in Brazil, China, France, Australia, Spain, and the US. A draft genebank survey questionnaire was presented to the group comments and suggested changes for improvement were received. Citrus curators and genebank managers throughout the world will be surveyed for the status and health of their collections. The surveys will be received and compiled by collaborators at the University of California, Riverside, and at the USDA ARS Riverside. This information will be compiled and reported. The strategy will include background and history of the development of Citrus as a cultivated crop, conservation protocols, vulnerabilities, and recommendations for safeguarding Citrus germplasm. This strategy will be implemented through the Global Crop Diversity Trust with collaboration from the International Society for Horticultural Science and the international Citrus research community.