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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315866

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Research needs and prioritizations for studies linking dietary sugars and potentially related health outcomes

Author
item Chung, Mei - Tufts University
item Wang, Ding Ding - Tufts University
item Archer, Edward - University Of Alabama
item Higgins, Janine - University Of Colorado
item Kim, Sery - Consultant
item Laughlin, Maren - National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases
item Qi, Lu - Harvard University
item Raatz, Susan
item Siegel, Richard - Tufts University
item Slavin, Joanne - University Of Minnesota
item Spahn, Joanne - US Department Of Agriculture (USDA)
item Steffen, Dan - Consultant
item Warshaw, Hope - Hope Warshaw Associates, Llc
item Tang, Alice - Tufts University

Submitted to: Biomedical Central Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/7/2016
Publication Date: 11/14/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5695355
Citation: Chung, M., Wang, D., Archer, E., Higgins, J., Kim, S., Laughlin, M., Qi, L., Raatz, S.K., Siegel, R.D., Slavin, J.L., Spahn, J., Steffen, D., Warshaw, H., Tang, A.M. 2016. Research needs and prioritizations for studies linking dietary sugars and potentially related health outcomes. Biomedical Central Nutrition. doi:10.1186/s40795-016-0108-0.

Interpretive Summary: Associations among dietary sugars and a variety of chronic diseases and obesity have spawned interest in investigating the metabolic effects of fructose and sugars in general. An approach developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for assessing future research needs (FRN) was implemented with modifications to integrate an evidence-map analysis of the characteristics of existing research studies. A panel of 14 stakeholders across 7 pre-defined areas of expertise (lay audience, policy maker, health provider, research funder, evidence-based methodologist, product maker, and researcher) was assembled to prioritize research needs in the broad field of sugars and health outcomes. A total of 212 studies were analyzed descriptively in evidence mapping, and the results were used to inform the stakeholder panel discussions on research needs. The stakeholder panel identified and prioritized 14 research questions, covering 7 broad topic areas -- body weight, body composition, appetite or satiety, diet quality, diabetes risk, liver fat or liver health, and cardiovascular disease risks. The top three high-priority FRN research questions selected by the stakeholder panel focused on the effect of dietary sugars on body weight or body composition, fat deposition, and satiety and appetite. Research considerations for the top three research questions and crosscutting research design issues were discussed in this review. Descriptive evidence mapping reduced the burden of stakeholders to become familiar with the characteristics of existing studies and may empower those who are not familiar with the topic areas to participate in the FRN discussions. Involving a diverse stakeholder panel to prioritize the direction of future research may have the potential to add general public influence on how research needs are defined or determined and to inform public health policy.

Technical Abstract: An approach developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for assessing future research needs (FRN) regarding dietary sugars was implemented. A panel of 14 stakeholders across 7 pre-defined areas of expertise (lay audience, policy maker, health provider, research funder, evidence-based methodologist, product maker, and researcher) was assembled to prioritize research needs in the broad field of sugars and health outcomes. Research considerations for the top three research questions and crosscutting research design issues were discussed in this review. Descriptive evidence mapping reduced the burden of stakeholders to become familiar with the characteristics of existing studies and may empower those who are not familiar with the topic areas to participate in the FRN discussions. Involving a diverse stakeholder panel to prioritize the direction of future research may have the potential to add general public influence on how research needs are defined or determined and to inform public health policy.