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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315645

Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO CONTROL VIRAL DISEASES OF CATTLE

Location: Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research

Title: Pestiviruses: old enemies and new challenges

Author
item Ridpath, Julia
item Neill, John

Submitted to: Animal Health Research Reviews
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/2/2015
Publication Date: 6/10/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/61336
Citation: Ridpath, J.F., Neill, J.D. 2015. Pestiviruses: old enemies and new challenges. Animal Health Research Reviews. 16(1):1-3. DOI: 10.1017/S1466252315000134.

Interpretive Summary: This article is the introduction for a special issue of Animal Health Research and Reviews. This special issue grew out of the keynote talks presented at a joint meeting of the US BVDV Symposia Committee and the European Society for Veterinary Virology that was held October 14 and 15, 2014. The theme of this meeting was “Pestiviruses: Old enemies and new challenges”. Pestiviruses are a group of viruses infect both domesticated livestock and wild animals such as deer, mountain goats, bison and antelope. The papers in this special issue are organized around the following themes; pestiviruses and the immune system, genetic variability, the emergence of new pestiviruses and pestivirus control programs.

Technical Abstract: The genesis for this special issue on pestiviruses was a joint meeting on pestiviruses organized by the US BVDV Symposia Committee and the European Society for Veterinary Virology that was held October 14 and 15, 2014. The theme of the meeting was “Pestiviruses: Old enemies and new challenges”. The impetus for this joint effort was the recognition that regional approaches to disease control are at odds with the worldwide traffic in animal products and biologics. Further, the control of newly recognized pestiviruses, such as HoBi-like viruses, is more effective when approached as a global challenge rather than any one nation’s problem. The joint meeting featured talks by researchers from North America, South America, Australia and Europe. The papers in this issue arose from keynote talks presented at the joint meeting and are organized around the following themes; pestiviruses and the immune system, genetic variability, the emergence of new pestiviruses and pestivirus control programs.