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ARS Home » Plains Area » Bushland, Texas » Conservation and Production Research Laboratory » Livestock Nutrient Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315494

Research Project: DEVELOP TECHNOLOGIES TO PROTECT AIR QUALITY, MAINTAIN PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY & ENHANCE USE OF MANURE FROM SOUTHN GREAT PLAINS BEEF & DAIRY AG

Location: Livestock Nutrient Management Research

Title: Effects of treating sorghum wet distillers grains with solubles with fibrolytic enzymes on nutrient digestibility and performance in finishing beef steers

Author
item Brauer, Casey - Texas A&m Agrilife
item Macdonald, James - University Of Nebraska
item Cole, Noel
item Mccollum, F - Texas A&m Agrilife
item Jennings, Jenny - Texas A&m Agrilife

Submitted to: American Society of Animal Science Southern Section Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2014
Publication Date: 2/3/2015
Citation: Brauer, C.L., Macdonald, J.C., Cole, N.A., Mccollum, F.T., Jennings, J.S. 2015. Effects of treating sorghum wet distillers grains with solubles with fibrolytic enzymes on nutrient digestibility and performance in finishing beef steers. American Society of Animal Science Southern Section Meeting. Paper No. 35.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of treating sorghum WDG with solubles (SWDG) with an enzyme, or enzyme-buffer combination on diet digestibility and feedlot performance. Experimental treatments are; 1) untreated SWDG (control), 2) addition of an enzyme complex to SWDG (enzyme); and 3) addition of enzyme complex and limestone buffer to SWDG (E+B). Sorghum WDG was included at 45% (DMB) of the finishing diet. The enzyme complex was a proprietary blend containing both exogenous and endogenous fibrolytic enzymes, and added at rate of 6 L/ton of SWDG (DMB). In experiment 1, six crossbred steers (initial BW = 577 kg) were used to evaluate digestibility characteristics. Data were analyzed using PROC GLM of SAS. No differences (P > 0.28) in DMI, or digestibility of DM, OM, and starch between treatments were detected. Cattle fed E + B treatment tended (P = 0.07) to have a higher ruminal pH than control or enzyme fed steers, and NDF digestibility tended (P = 0.15) to be greater for E + B fed steers. In experiment 2, 54 beef steers (initial BW = 370 ± 9 kg) were used in a finishing study to evaluate performance and carcass characteristics. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS. DMI for the feeding period tended (P = 0.15) to be lower for E + B fed cattle compared to the control. No other effects on performance were detected during the feeding period between enzyme versus control fed cattle or E + B versus control fed cattle (P > 0.35 and 0.32, respectively). Standard carcass measurements did not differ (P > 0.43) between enzyme and control fed cattle or between E + B and control fed cattle. However, E + B cattle had less rib fat (P = 0.09) and graded lower (P = 0.03). Furthermore, the E + B fed cattle had significantly (P = 0.05) larger REA than control fed cattle. Conclusively, while treating SWDGS with a buffered fibrolytic enzyme complex had positive effects on NDF digestibility, no corresponding improvements in cattle performance were detected.