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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315374

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF LEPIDOPTERA: INVASIVE SPECIES, PESTS, AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: Annotated check list of the Pyraloidea (Lepidoptera) of America North of Mexico

Author
item Scholtens, B. - College Of Charleston
item Solis, M

Submitted to: ZooKeys
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/14/2015
Publication Date: 11/13/2015
Citation: Scholtens, B.G., Solis, M.A. 2015. Annotated check list of the Pyraloidea (Lepidoptera) of America North of Mexico. ZooKeys. 535:1-132.

Interpretive Summary: The moth families Pyralidae and Crambidae include over 15,000 species worldwide and many are major crop and forest pests. This list of pyraloid species is updated from the last work in 1983. It includes newly described species, tropical species newly reported from the United States, and new introductions from Europe and Asia. The annotations provide a description of the action and citations to all changes since 1983. This list is important in the detection of exotic and potential invasive species to the United States and Canada. It will be used by scientists, state departments of agriculture, and APHIS personnel.

Technical Abstract: An annotated check list of Pyraloidea of North America is presented, including 856 Crambidae and 685 Pyralidae with 1541 total species. All new species described, tropical species with new records in the United States, and species introduced from Europe and Asia since 1983 are included. In addition, seven new generic combinations and 3 new records for the United States are proposed. No new taxa are described. The superfamily classification is updated to reflect research over last 30 years, including exclusion of Thyrididae and Hyblaeidae from the superfamily and recognition of Crambidae and Pyralidae as separate families. The list includes multiple changes to subfamilies based on recent molecular phylogenetic work.