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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wenatchee, Washington » Physiology and Pathology of Tree Fruits Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315335

Research Project: Integration of Host-Genotype and Manipulation of Soil Biology for Soil-borne Disease Control in Agro-Ecosystems

Location: Physiology and Pathology of Tree Fruits Research

Title: Integration of apple rootstock genotype with reduced Brassica seed meal application rates for replant disease control

Author
item WANG, LIKUN - Beijing Forestry University
item Mazzola, Mark

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/15/2015
Publication Date: 11/1/2015
Citation: Wang, L., Mazzola, M. 2015. Integration of apple rootstock genotype with reduced Brassica seed meal application rates for replant disease control. Phytopathology. 105:S4.145.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Pre-plant soil application of Brassica seed meal (SM) formulations can provide fumigant level control of apple replant disease. However, due to high cost of the SM treatment relative to non-tarped soil fumigation, reduced application rates would likely accelerate commercial adoption of this technology. A Brassica juncea/Sinapis alba (1:1) SM formulation was applied to replant orchard soil at 1, 2 or 3 (standard) ton per acre. Regardless of rate, all SM treatments effectively suppressed Pratylenchus penetrans root densities and increased tree biomass relative to the no-treatment control for all rootstock genotypes. The replant susceptible rootstocks M9 and MM106 showed a general increase in tree growth at increasing SM rates; however, there was no additional increase in growth when application rate was elevated from 2 ton to 3 ton when used in conjunction with the replant tolerant rootstocks G41 and G210. After five months growth, rhizosphere microbial communities were similar for the control and 1 ton per acre SM treatment, but the 2 and 3 ton per acre rate possessed communities that were similar to each other but distinct from the control. These findings suggest that a reduced SM application rate when employed with the appropriate apple rootstock genotype may provide sufficient replant disease control.