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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315274

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Plane of nutrition during the preweaned period and Mannheimia haemolytica dose influence metabolic responses in post-weaned Holstein calves challenged with bovine herpesvirus-1 and Mannheimia haemolytica

Author
item Sharon, Kate - Texas Tech University
item Liang, Yu - Texas Tech University
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Broadway, Paul
item Ballou, Michael - Texas Tech University

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/22/2015
Publication Date: 7/1/2015
Citation: Sharon, K.P., Liang, Y.L., Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Broadway, P.R., Ballou, M. 2015. Plane of nutrition during the preweaned period and Mannheimia haemolytica dose influence metabolic responses in post-weaned Holstein calves challenged with bovine herpesvirus-1 and Mannheimia haemolytica. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 93 (E-Supplement 3):193, Abstract#27.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: To determine whether previous plane of milk replacer nutrition (PON) and M. haemolytica (MH) dose influences metabolic responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge, Holstein calves (1 day of age; n=30) were assigned to treatments in a 2 x 3 factorial with preweaned PON and dose of MH as main effects (n=5/treatment). Calves were fed either a low (LPN; n=15) or a high PON (HPN; n=15) from birth through weaning. Calves fed the LPN were fed 445g dry matter/day of milk replacer until weaning, and HPN calves were fed 830g dry matter/day of milk replacer from 1 to 10 days and 1080g from 11 days until weaning. Calf starter and water were offered ad libitum. Calves were step-down weaned beginning at 54 days and moved into an enclosed barn at 70 days. Indwelling jugular catheters were inserted at 80 days. Calves were challenged with 1.5x10^8 plaque forming units/mL/nostril of bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) at 81 days and with 10^6, 10^7, or 10^8 colony forming units of MH at 84 days. Blood samples were collected at varying intervals respective to BHV-1 and MH challenges. Body weights at 70 days were different (P<0.01) between LPN and HPN calves (62.2 vs 81.2 +/- 2.67 kg, respectively). Although HPN calves consumed more calf starter (P<0.01) during the challenge, there were no differences (P=0.42) in average daily gain or when intake was expressed per kg bdoy weight^0.75. Glucose concentrations were greater (P=0.02) in HPN compared to LPN calves during both BHV-1 (61.1 vs 57.5 +/- 1.01 mg/dL, respectively) and MH challenges (57.8 vs 53.5 +/- 1.13 mg/dL, respectively). Following the MH challenge, calves receiving 10^8 MH had the greatest (P=0.05) NEFA concentrations. During the BHV-1 challenge, there was a time x PON interaction (P=0.02) for plasma urea N concentrations, where LPN calves had greater (P=0.02) concentrations at 72 hours. Glucose concentrations were reduced among LPN calves throughout the respiratory challenge, and calves receiving 10^8 MH mobilized more lipid reserves after the MH challenge suggesting calves fed a LPN during preweaning and calves receiving a 10^8 MH dose results in a more severe response to a viral-bacterial respiratory challenge.