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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315121

Research Project: SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS OF VEGETABLES AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: The entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea and its compatibility with buprofezin: effects on the rugose spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus rugioperculatus

Author
item Kumar, Vivek - University Of Florida
item Mckenzie, Cindy
item Avery, Pasco - University Of Florida
item Cave, Ronald - University Of Florida
item Francis, Antonio - Florida Department Of Plant Industries
item Smith, Trevor - Florida Department Of Plant Industries
item Osborne, Lance - University Of Florida

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America, Southwestern and Southeastern Branch
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/6/2015
Publication Date: 3/15/2015
Citation: Kumar, V., McKenzie, C.L., Avery, P.B., Cave, R.D., Francis, A., Smith, T., Osborne, L.S. 2015. The entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea and its compatibility with buprofezin: effects on the rugose spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus rugioperculatus [abstract]. Entomological Society of America, Southwestern and Southeastern Branch, March 15-18, 2015, Biloxi, Mississippi.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The gumbo limbo or rugose spiraling whitefly is a new invasive pest of palms, woody ornamentals, and fruits in Florida. The pathogenicity of a naturally occurring entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea (PFR 97) is well known for its activity against commonly found whiteflies species in the region. We tested the efficacy of this entomopathogenic fungus alone and in combination with an insect growth regulator (Talus®) against the rugose spiraling whitefly. Results from efficacy trial showed Talus alone or in combination with PFR 97 was more effective compared to PFR 97 alone. PFR 97 was effective for 28 days. Results from this study will be significant for the development of a biocontrol strategy against this invasive pest.