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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Quality & Safety Assessment Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314809

Research Project: Develop Methods to Assess and Improve Poultry and Eggs Quality

Location: Quality & Safety Assessment Research

Title: Effects of plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol on lipid oxidation, residual nitrites, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines formation during ripening and storage of dry-cured bacon

Author
item Wang, Yongli - Nanjing Agricultural University
item Li, Feng - Shandong Agricultural University
item Zhuang, Hong
item Chen, Xiao - Nanjing Agricultural University
item Li, Lianghao - Nanjing Agricultural University
item Qiao, Weiwei - Nanjing Agricultural University
item Zhang, Jianhao - Nanjing Agricultural University

Submitted to: LWT - Food Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2014
Publication Date: 9/16/2014
Citation: Wang, Y., Li, F., Zhuang, H., Chen, X., Li, L., Qiao, W., Zhuang, J. 2014. Effects of plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol on lipid oxidation, residual nitrites, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines formation during ripening and storage of dry-cured bacon. LWT - Food Science and Technology. 60:199-206.

Interpretive Summary: Lipid oxidation, nitrite residues, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines directly affect quality and safety of dry-cured bacon. Polyphenolic compounds and a-tocopherol are well known for their antioxidant activity and health benefits. The objective of the present study was to investigate the benefits of use of plant polyphenols (more specifically, green tea polyphenols) and a-tocopherol in dry-cured bacon production based on their effects on lipid oxidation, nitrite residue content, biogenic amine formation, and N-nitrosamines formation, as well as meat quality during ripening and storage. Our result show that adding either plant polyphenols or a-tocopherol resulted in reduced lipid oxidation, nitrite residual content, biogenic amine formation, and N-nitrosamine formation in dry-cured bacons. In addition, either plant polyphenols or a-tocopherol treatments also could reduce pH and bacterial populations of dry-cured bacon. These results suggest that either plant polyphenols or a-tocopherol can be used in dry-cured bacons to improve product quality, shelf life, and safety.

Technical Abstract: Effects of plant polyphenols (green tea polyphenols (GTP) and grape seed extract (GSE) and a-tocopherol on physicochemical parameters, lipid oxidation, residual nitrite, microbiological counts, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines were determined in bacons during dry-curing and storage. Results show that plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol significantly decreased pH, lipid oxidation (formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), and residual nitrite content compared with control (P < 0.05) at the end of ripening. Microbial counts, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) contents in dry-cured bacons were significantly affected by plant polyphenols or a-tocopherol (P < 0.05), with GTP being the most effective in reducing aerobic plate counts (APC), Enterobacteriaceae, and biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine and spermine), as well as in inhibiting the NDMA formation (P < 0.05). Principal component analysis indicated that there were positive correlations between physicochemical factors, biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine and spermine), NDMA, and APC, and between the TBARS and sodium nitrite. There was a negative correlation between NDMA and nitrite. These findings suggest plant polyphenols, especially GTP, and a-tocopherol could be utilized for processing dry cured bacons to improve quality, shelf life, and safety of finished products.