Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » WHGQ » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314744

Research Project: Improved Control of Stripe Rust in Cereal Crops

Location: Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research

Title: Molecular mapping of YrSP and its relationship with other genes for stripe rust resistance in wheat chromosome 2BL

Author
item FENG, JUNYAN - Washington State University
item WANG, MEINAN - Washington State University
item Chen, Xianming
item See, Deven
item ZHENG, YOULIANG - Sichuan Agricultural University
item Chao, Shiaoman
item WAN, ANMIN - Washington State University

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/8/2015
Publication Date: 9/1/2015
Citation: Feng, J., Wang, M., Chen, X., See, D.R., Zheng, Y., Chao, S., Wan, A. 2015. Molecular mapping of YrSP and its relationship with other genes for stripe rust resistance in wheat chromosome 2BL. Phytopathology. 105(9):1206-1213.

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rust is an important disease of wheat worldwide. Resistance is the best way to control the disease. YrSP, a gene originally from wheat variety Spaldings Prolific and providing resistance to a broad spectrum of races, is used for differentiating races of the stripe rust pathogen, but its chromosomal location is not clear. To map YrSP, a wheat line with the gene was backcrossed to susceptible wheat line Avocet S. Genetic analysis of the progeny confirmed a single dominant gene for resistance. A total of 182 progeny lines were phenotyped with an avirulent race and genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR), single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and sequence tagged site (STS) markers. A linkage map was constructed with 3 SSR, 17 SNP, and 3 STS markers linked to the resistance gene. The gene was mapped in a chromosome region physically within the proximal 50% of the long arm of chromosome 2B. Through race tests and genetic analyses of crosses made with wheat lines carrying other stripe rust resistance genes on the same chromosome, YrSP was determined to be closely linked to, but at locus different from the loci of genes Yr5, Yr7, Yr43, Yr44, and Yr53. The specificity of YrSP is useful in differentiating Pst races and studying the plant-pathogen interactions, and the chromosomal location information and tightly linked markers will be useful in developing wheat cultivars when combined with other genes for stripe rust resistance.

Technical Abstract: Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is an important disease of wheat worldwide. Resistance is the best way to control the disease. YrSP, a gene originally from wheat variety Spaldings Prolific and providing resistance to a broad spectrum of races, is used for differentiating Pst races, but its chromosomal location is not clear. To map YrSP, a near-isogenic line (AvSYrSPNIL) was backcrossed to the recurrent parent, Avocet S. Genetic analysis of the BC7F1, BC8, BC7F2, and BC7F3 progenies confirmed a single dominant gene for resistance. A total of 182 BC7F2 plants and their derived BC7F3 lines were phenotyped with an avirulent Pst race and genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR), single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and sequence tagged site (STS) markers. A linkage map was constructed with 3 SSR, 17 SNP, and 3 STS markers covering 23.3 cM. Markers IWA638 and dp269 were 0.6 cM proximal and 1.5 cM distal, respectively, to YrSP. The gene was mapped in chromosome bin 2BL-C–0.5, physically within the proximal 50% of the chromosome 2BL arm. Allelism tests based on F2 phenotypes indicated that YrSP is closely linked to, but not allelic with genes Yr5, Yr7, Yr43, Yr44, and Yr53. Infection type data from tests with ten historical and currently predominant Pst races in the U.S. also demonstrated differences in specificity between YrSP and the other genes. The specificity of YrSP is useful in differentiating Pst races and studying the plant-pathogen interactions, and the information of chromosomal location of the gene and its tightly linked markers should be useful in developing resistant cultivars when combined with other genes for resistance to stripe rust.