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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Dry Bean Nutritional and Processing Qualities

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Title: Genetic Diversity and Genome Wide Association Analysis of Cooking Time in Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

Author
item Cichy, Karen
item Wiesinger, Jason
item Mendoza, Fernando

Submitted to: Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/27/2015
Publication Date: 5/24/2015
Citation: Cichy, K.A., Wiesinger, J., Mendoza, F. 2015. Genetic diversity and genome wide association analysis of cooking time in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 128(8):1555-1567.

Interpretive Summary: Dry beans require long cooking times to become palatable although there are some dry beans varieties that cook faster than others. The objective of this research was to assess the genetic diversity for cooking time in a set of ~200 bean accessions and to determine the genetic control of cooking time in beans. The beans were grown in Entrican, MI over two field seasons. In this study 5.5 fold variation for cooking time was found. The average cook time was 37 min and the fastest cooking line cooked in less than 22 min. Genome wide association revealed regions on chromosomes Pv02, Pv03 and Pv06 associated with cook time. This work will help develop programs to develop fast cooking bean cultivars.

Technical Abstract: Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a nutrient dense food and a dietary staple in parts of Africa and Latin America. One of the major factors that limits greater utilization of beans is their long cooking times compared to other foods. Cooking time is an important trait with implications for gender equity, nutritional value of diets, and energy utilization. Very little is known about the genetic diversity and genomic regions involved in determining cooking time. The objective of this research was to assess cooking time on a panel of 206 P. vulgaris accessions, use genome wide association analysis to identify genomic regions influencing this trait and to test the ability to predict cooking time by raw seed characteristics. In this study 5.5 fold variation for cooking time was found and five bean accessions were identified which cook in less than 27 min across two years, where the average cook time was 37 min. One accession, ADP0367 cooked in less than 22 min. Four of these five accession showed close phylogenetic relationship based on a NJ tree developed with ~5000 SNP markers, suggesting similar underlying genetic mechanism. Genome wide association revealed regions on chromosomes Pv02, Pv03 and Pv06 associated with cook time. Vis/NIR scanning of raw seed explained 68% of the phenotypic variation for cooking time, suggesting with additional experimentation, it may be possible to use this spectroscopy method to non-destructively identify fast cooking lines as part of a breeding program.

Last Modified: 10/19/2017
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