Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314331

Research Project: Alternatives to Methyl Bromide Soil Fumigation for Vegetable and Floriculture Production

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Anaerobic soil disinfestation and soil borne pest management

Author
item Rosskopf, Erin
item Serrano-perez, Paula - Instituto De Investigaciones Agrarias Finca La Orden-Valdesequera
item Hong, Jason
item Shrestha, Utsala - University Of Tennessee
item Rodriguez-molina, Maria Delcarmen - Instituto De Investigaciones Agrarias Finca La Orden-Valdesequera
item Martin, Kendall - William Patterson University
item Burelle, Nancy
item Shennan, Carol - University Of California
item Muramoto, Joji - University Of California
item Butler, David - University Of Tennessee

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/27/2015
Publication Date: 11/10/2015
Citation: Rosskopf, E.N., Serrano-Perez, P., Hong, J.C., Shrestha, U., Rodriguez-Molina, M., Martin, K., Burelle, N.K., Shennan, C., Muramoto, J., Butler, D. 2015. Anaerobic soil disinfestation and soil borne pest management. Book Chapter. Chapter 13, Vol:46, pages 277-305.

Interpretive Summary: Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing microbial respiration through incorporation of easily decomposable, carbon-rich organic amendments into moist soil and by preventing the re-supply of oxygen through the soil surface by coverage with plastic film for a period of time; as short as two weeks or as long as fifteen weeks. ASD research is increasing in the USA , the Netherlands, and Japan. Several different approaches and inputs have been tested with variable levels of pest control associated with different amendments and application techniques. The current practice in Florida, for example, utilizes two easily obtained agricultural waste products, composted broiler litter and feed-grade blackstrap molasses obtained from the sugar processing industry. These inputs are incorporated into prepared planting areas, either in a broad-cast application, typical of cut-flower production or in a preformed raised bed that is characteristic of vegetable systems in the southeast. After incorporation, the bed or flat ground is covered using either clear, UV-stabilized solarization film that is later replaced, or with totally impermeable polyethylene film (TIF) which can remain in the field during crop production. Research in Florida has established that for fall production on sandy soils, 5 cm of water applied via a double drip tape under the polyethylene mulch is adequate for the development of anaerobic conditions. Similar approaches were pioneered in California, principally without the addition of composted animal waste as a nitrogen source, using locally-available agricultural waste, such as rice bran. Work on this technique is moving into other countries as well. In Spain, the inputs currently in trials include grape pomace, rapeseed cake, beer pomace, and rice bran.

Technical Abstract: Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing microbial respiration through incorporation of easily decomposable, carbon-rich organic amendments into moist soil and by preventing the re-supply of oxygen through the soil surface by coverage with plastic film for a period of time; as short as two weeks or as long as fifteen weeks. ASD research is increasing in the USA , the Netherlands, and Japan. Several different approaches and inputs have been tested with variable levels of pest control associated with different amendments and application techniques. The current practice in Florida, for example, utilizes two easily obtained agricultural waste products, composted broiler litter and feed-grade blackstrap molasses obtained from the sugar processing industry. These inputs are incorporated into prepared planting areas, either in a broad-cast application, typical of cut-flower production or in a preformed raised bed that is characteristic of vegetable systems in the southeast. After incorporation, the bed or flat ground is covered using either clear, UV-stabilized solarization film that is later replaced, or with totally impermeable polyethylene film (TIF) which can remain in the field during crop production. Research in Florida has established that for fall production on sandy soils, 5 cm of water applied via a double drip tape under the polyethylene mulch is adequate for the development of anaerobic conditions. Similar approaches were pioneered in California, principally without the addition of composted animal waste as a nitrogen source, using locally-available agricultural waste, such as rice bran. Work on this technique is moving into other countries as well. In Spain, the inputs currently in trials include grape pomace, rapeseed cake, beer pomace, and rice bran. All aspects of ASD are reviewed, including soil chemistry, changes in microbial communities as a result of ASD treatment, and crop fertility.