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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314015

Research Project: BLUETONGUE VIRUS PATHOGENESIS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, AND CONTROL MEASURES

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Orbiviruses – A North American Perspective

Author
item McVey, David
item Drolet, Barbara
item Ruder, Mark
item Wilson, William
item Nayduch, Dana
item Pfannenstiel, Robert
item Cohnstaedt, Lee
item MACLACHLAN, JAMES - University Of California
item Gay, Cyril

Submitted to: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/1/2015
Publication Date: 6/18/2015
Citation: McVey, D.S., Drolet, B.S., Ruder, M.G., Wilson, W.C., Nayduch, D., Pfannenstiel, R.S., Cohnstaedt, L.W., Maclachlan, J.N., Gay, C.G. 2015. Orbiviruses – A North American Perspective. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. 15(6):335-338. https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2014.1699.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2014.1699

Interpretive Summary: Orbiviruses are members of the Reoviridae family and include bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV). These viruses are the cause of significant regional disease outbreaks among livestock and wildlife in the United States. Some of these outbreaks have been characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Competent vectors are clearly present in most regions of the globe; therefore, all segments of production livestock are at risk for serious disease outbreaks. The USDA, in collaboration with DOI, organized a gap analysis workshop composed of international experts on Orbiviruses. The workshop participants met at the Arthropod-Borne Animal Diseases Research Unit in Manhattan, Kansas, May 14–16, 2013, to assess the available scientific information and status of currently available countermeasures to effectively control and mitigate the impact of an outbreak of an emerging Orbivirus with epizootic potential, with special emphasis given to BTV and EHDV. The workshop participants determined that available countermeasures are somewhat effective, but several weaknesses were identified that affect their ability to effectively prevent and control disease outbreaks.

Technical Abstract: Orbiviruses are members of the Reoviridae family and include bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV). These viruses are the cause of significant regional disease outbreaks among livestock and wildlife in the United States. Some of these outbreaks have been characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Competent vectors are clearly present in most regions of the globe; therefore, all segments of production livestock are at risk for serious disease outbreaks. Subclinical infections also serve as reservoirs of infection and often result in significant trade restrictions. The economic and explicit impacts of BTV and EHDV infections are difficult to measure, but infections are a cause of economic loss for producers and loss of natural resources (wildlife). In response to USAHA Resolution 16, USDA, in collaboration with DOI, organized a gap analysis workshop composed of international experts on Orbiviruses. The workshop participants met at the Arthropod-Borne Animal Diseases Research Unit in Manhattan, Kansas, May 14–16, 2013, to assess the available scientific information and status of currently available countermeasures to effectively control and mitigate the impact of an outbreak of an emerging Orbivirus with epizootic potential, with special emphasis given to BTV and EHDV. In assessing the threats, workshop participants determined that available countermeasures are somewhat effective, but several weaknesses were identified that affect their ability to effectively prevent and control disease outbreaks.