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ARS Home » Midwest Area » West Lafayette, Indiana » Crop Production and Pest Control Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313910

Research Project: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF PLANT PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS IN CEREAL CROPS

Location: Crop Production and Pest Control Research

Title: The threat of hybrid Phytophthoras

Author
item BECKERMAN, JANNA - Purdue University
item Goodwin, Stephen - Steve
item GIBSON, KEVIN - Purdue University

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/15/2014
Publication Date: 12/18/2014
Citation: Beckerman, J., Goodwin, S.B., Gibson, K. 2014. The threat of hybrid Phytophthoras. In: USDA Forest Service Proceedings, RMRS-P-72. Joint meeting of the Northeast Forest and Conservation Nursery Association and Southern Forest Nursery Association, July 22-25, 2013, Lafayette, Indiana. page 12-17.

Interpretive Summary: The majority of invasive plant pathogens have resulted from the introduction of exotic organisms. However, another mechanism for invasiveness results from hybridization between species. This phenomenon has been documented in plants and animals, but its role in plant pathology has only recently been recognized. With more than 100 species of Phytophthora identified to date, and little information regarding their biogeography and native habitat, Phytophthora hybrids are difficult to detect. Unfortunately, recent taxonomic surveys for Phytophthora in the nursery, greenhouse and landscape have identified multiple hybrids involving different parental species. Their spread via the international plant trade poses significant risks to ecosystems throughout the world.

Technical Abstract: The majority of invasive plant pathogens have resulted from the introduction of exotic organisms. However, another mechanism for invasiveness results from hybridization between species. This phenomenon has been documented in plants and animals, but its role in plant pathology has only recently been recognized. With more than 100 species of Phytophthora identified to date, and little information regarding their biogeography and native habitat, Phytophthora hybrids are difficult to detect. Unfortunately, recent taxonomic surveys for Phytophthora in the nursery, greenhouse and landscape have identified multiple hybrids involving different parental species. Their spread via the international plant trade poses significant risks to ecosystems throughout the world.