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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Healthy Body Weight Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313601

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance

Location: Healthy Body Weight Research

Title: Resistance training and mitochondrial metabolism

Author
item Flack, Kyle
item Davy, Kevin - Virginia Tech
item Hulver, Matthew - Virginia Tech
item Frisard, Madlyn - Virginia Tech
item Anderson, Angela - Pikes Peak Community College
item Boutagy, Nabil - Virginia Tech
item Savla, Jyoti - Virginia Tech
item Winett, Richard - Virginia Tech
item Davy, Brenda - Virginia Tech

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2015
Publication Date: 3/28/2015
Citation: Flack, K.D., Davy, K.P., Hulver, M.W., Frisard, M.I., Anderson, A., Boutagy, N., Savla, J., Winett, R.A., Davy, B.M. 2015. Resistance training and mitochondrial metabolism [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29:LB363.

Interpretive Summary: Objective: To determine if resistance exercise training improves skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity in older adults. Background: A decline in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity occurs with aging. Aerobic exercise increases skeletal muscle’s ability to oxidize multiple substrates. The role resistance exercise training (RT) has on skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity is unclear. Methods: 19 males aged =60 were randomized (RT=11, sedentary control=8). RT included 7 machine exercises, 1 set to failure ~8-12 reps, 3x/week for 12 weeks. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the v. lateralis at baseline and 12 weeks. Palmitate and pyruvate oxidation, enzyme activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ß-HAD) and citrate synthase (CS) were assessed from muscle homogenates, strength from 3-rep maximum (3RM). Results: 3RM improved 75 and 74 % (P<0.01) for chest and leg press with RT. No change in total fatty acid (1.23±4.76 vs. 0.64±6.74 nm CO2/hr) or pyruvate oxidation (150.11 ± 291.76 vs. 53.28±302.44 nm CO2/mg/hr, P>0.05) in RT vs control respectively. ß-HAD increased (6.89±8.94 ng/mg/min, P<0.05) but not CS with RT. Conclusions: These results suggest that 12 weeks of RT does not change skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in older men.

Technical Abstract: Objective: To determine if resistance exercise training improves skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity in older adults. Background: A decline in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity occurs with aging. Aerobic exercise increases skeletal muscle’s ability to oxidize multiple substrates. The role resistance exercise training (RT) has on skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity is unclear. Methods: 19 males aged =60 were randomized (RT=11, sedentary control=8). RT included 7 machine exercises, 1 set to failure ~8-12 reps, 3x/week for 12 weeks. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the v. lateralis at baseline and 12 weeks. Palmitate and pyruvate oxidation, enzyme activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ß-HAD) and citrate synthase (CS) were assessed from muscle homogenates, strength from 3-rep maximum (3RM). Results: 3RM improved 75 and 74 % (P<0.01) for chest and leg press with RT. No change in total fatty acid (1.23±4.76 vs. 0.64±6.74 nm CO2/hr) or pyruvate oxidation (150.11 ± 291.76 vs. 53.28±302.44 nm CO2/mg/hr, P>0.05) in RT vs control respectively. ß-HAD increased (6.89±8.94 ng/mg/min, P<0.05) but not CS with RT. Conclusions: These results suggest that 12 weeks of RT does not change skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in older men.