Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Oxford, Mississippi » National Sedimentation Laboratory » Watershed Physical Processes Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313469

Research Project: Technologies for Managing Water and Sediment Movement in Agricultural Watersheds

Location: Watershed Physical Processes Research

Title: A multifaceted approach to prioritize and design bank stabilization measures along the Big Sioux River, South Dakota, USA

Author
item Langendoen, Eddy
item ABAD, JORGE - University Of Pittsburgh
item BENNETT, SEAN - University Of Buffalo

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/16/2015
Publication Date: 6/20/2015
Citation: Langendoen, E.J., Abad, J.D., Bennett, S.J. 2015. A multifaceted approach to prioritize and design bank stabilization measures along the Big Sioux River, South Dakota, USA. I.S. Rivers 2015, June 22-26, 2015, Lyon, France. (3 pp) (Online URL: http://www.graie.org/ISRivers/docs/papers/2C35-53644LAN.pdf).

Interpretive Summary: The successful management of riverine resources requires a multi-disciplinary approach between scientific knowledge and feedback on management practice. Scientists at the USDA, ARS, National Sedimentation Laboratory in collaboration with scientists at the University of Pittsburgh and the State University of New York and Buffalo used a multifaceted approach to design and test new environmentally bank protection structures in close cooperation with consulting industry and state (South Dakota) and local (City of Sioux Falls) agencies. Simulations with the ARS' CONCEPTS and RVR Meander computer models were conducted to identify stream-bank erosion locations on the Big Sioux River, and prioritize these locations for future stabilization. Guidelines for the design, construction, and installation of environment-friendly engineered log jams were developed using physical scale modeling. The government agencies directly participated in the development of data sets for the computer models, interpretation of computer model outcome, and design of the engineered log jams. The followed approach resulted in improved decision support and best practices specific for the Big Sioux River.

Technical Abstract: A multifaceted approach was used to manage fine-grained sediment loadings from river bank erosion along the Big Sioux River between Dell Rapids and Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA. Simulations with the RVR Meander and CONCEPTS river-morphodynamics computer models were conducted to identify stream-bank erosion locations, and prioritise these locations for future stabilisation. Guidelines for the design, construction, and installation of environment-friendly engineered log jams (ELJs) specific for the Big Sioux River were developed using physical scale modelling. The modelling efforts were supported by an extensive field data collection effort to characterise channel form and the erosion resistance properties of the boundary materials. Computer modelling identified 1.8 km (5.5%) of the study reach as having severe erosion potential (> 15 m/yr for flows greater than bank full). Physical modelling indicated that the length and width of the bed deformation downstream of the ELJ can be as large as 22 and 15 times the bank-full flow depth, respectively. The potential length of bank protection provided by an ELJ can be as large as 30 times the bank-full flow depth.