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Research Project: Strategies to Predict and Manipulate Responses of Crops and Crop Disease to Anticipated Changes of Carbon Dioxide, Ozone and Temperature

Location: Plant Science Research

Title: Biologically based fertilizer recommendations to meet yield expectations and preserve water quality

Author
item Franzluebbers, Alan
item Crozier, Carl - North Carolina State University
item Haney, Richard
item Kaye, Jason - Pennsylvania State University
item Kemanian, Armen - Pennsylvania State University
item Mirsky, Steven
item Pershing, Molly - North Carolina State University
item Schomberg, Harry
item Thomason, Wade - Virginia Polytechnic Institution & State University
item White, Charlie - Pennsylvania State University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/10/2014
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Corn is one of the most demanding crops for N and therefore often requires a high rate of N fertilizer to achieve high productivity. Cost of N fertilizer has risen dramatically during the past decade. Our goal was to develop a biologically based tool to improve N management in high N demanding cereal crops. We hypothesized that a biologically based soil N test will (1) increase N fertilizer recommendations in specific soil conditions with low N-supplying capacity to improve productivity and (2) decrease N fertilizer recommendations in specific soil conditions with high N-supplying capacity to alleviate economic loss and environmental threats. Research in this project will help build an even firmer foundation of knowledge in fundamental (process of soil N mineralization) and applied (improved N fertilizer recommendations from a biological soil testing tool) agricultural science that will be vital for helping to solve the persistent water quality issues throughout the estuary regions of the Eastern Seaboard.