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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312890

Research Project: COUNTERMEASURES TO PREVENT, MITIGATE, AND CONTROL RIFT VALLEY FEVER (RVF)

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Chapter 30. Other Bunyavirus Infections

Author
item Wilson, William
item Gaudreault, Natasha
item Hossain, Mohammad - Kansas State University
item Mcvey, D Scott - Scott

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/29/2014
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This chapter reviews current and developing Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) diagnostic assays and provides a description of a viral genome based assay that is a strong presumptive positive test. RVFV is a mosquito-transmitted virus of sub-Saharan Africa that has caused disease outbreaks resulting in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily associated with domestic ruminants resulting in abortions and hemorrhagic disease but severe outbreaks can lead to human infection and deaths. Climate change and human activities (trade, irrigation and etc.) have increased concerns of increased insect transmitted disease outbreaks and movement of these viruses into new areas. The potential of RVFV one day being introduced into new areas such as Europe or North America have emphasized the need for developing specific and sensitive diagnostic assays.

Technical Abstract: Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily associated with sheep, goats and cattle resulting in abortions and hemorrhagic disease. Severe disease outbreaks that lead to human infection and deaths can be predicted by high rainfall and other measurable environmental conditions that lead to increased mosquito populations. Climate change and human activities (trade, irrigation and etc.) have increased concerns of arboviral disease outbreaks and movement of arboviruses into new ecosystems. The potential of RVFV one day being introduced into new ecosystems such as Europe or North America have emphasized the need for developing specific and sensitive diagnostic assays. This chapter reviews current and developing diagnostic assays and provides a description of a real-time RT-PCR assay that is a strong presumptive positive test.