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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Invasive Species and Pollinator Health » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312266

Research Project: Landscape-Level Assessment and Management of Invasive Weeds and their Impacts in Agricultural and Natural Systems

Location: Invasive Species and Pollinator Health

Title: Establishing research and management priorities for invasive water primroses (Ludwigia spp.)

Author
item Grewell, Brenda
item Netherland, Michael - Us Army Corp Of Engineers (USACE)
item Skaer Thomason, Meghan - University Of California

Submitted to: Government Publication/Report
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/22/2015
Publication Date: 2/1/2016
Citation: Grewell Brenda J., Michael D. Netherland, Meghan J. Skaer Thomason. 2016. Establishing research and management priorities for invasive water primroses (Ludwigia spp.). ERDC/EL TR-16-2, US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS

Interpretive Summary: This illustrated technical report is a product of a federal interagency agreement between the USDA-ARS Exotic & Invasive Weeds Research Unit, Western Regional Research Center’s Davis, California location and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Dr. Brenda Grewell (ARS, Davis, CA) and Dr. Michael Netherland (USACE, Gainesville, FL) are co-PIs on a continuing project to study factors influencing the spread, establishment, and management of invasive Ludwigia species. This technical report provides background information on invasive, aquatic Ludwigia species to assist aquatic resource managers. The report includes a description of the problems caused by these invasive plant species and why their current aggressive spread should concern resource managers and policymakers. Taxonomic information is included, as well as information about the ecology of the species. Original data from field research studies is included in a graph to illustrate the differences in biomass production above and below the water surface of shallow lakes by two Ludwigia species, since this information is very important when considering management approaches. Ecological impacts of the invasion such as competitive displacement of native species and degradation of water quality are reported, and economic and human health impacts are discussed. Several aquatic ecosystems in the USA that are impacted by invasive water primroses represent unique resources from a global perspective, and select case studies and management approaches are described. The report closes with a summary of current research activities and the identification of eight priorities for future research that will serve to address information gaps on water primroses, guide actions required to prevent further introductions, effectively respond to invasions, and encourage innovative approaches to this problem.

Technical Abstract: This technical report provides background information on invasive, aquatic Ludwigia species to assist aquatic resource managers. The report includes a description of the problems caused by these invasive plant species and why their current aggressive spread should concern resource managers and policymakers. Taxonomic information is included, as well as information about the ecology of the species. Original data from field research studies is included in a graph to illustrate the differences in biomass production above and below the water surface of shallow lakes by two Ludwigia species, since this information is very important when considering management approaches. Ecological impacts of the invasion such as competitive displacement of native species and degradation of water quality are reported, and economic and human health impacts are discussed. Several aquatic ecosystems in the USA that are impacted by invasive water primroses represent unique resources from a global perspective, and select case studies and management approaches are described. The report closes with a summary of current research activities and the identification of eight priorities for future research that will serve to address information gaps on water primroses, guide actions required to prevent further introductions, effectively respond to invasions, and encourage innovative approaches to this problem.