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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Surveys Research Group » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312182

Research Project: What We Eat in America - Dietary Survey: Data Collection, Interpretation, Dissemination, and Methodology

Location: Food Surveys Research Group

Title: Application of a new statistical model for measurement error to the evaluation of dietary self-report instruments

Author
item Freedman, Laurence - The Sheba Medical Center At Tel Hashomer
item Midthune, Douglas - National Cancer Institute (NCI, NIH)
item Carroll, Raymond - Texas A&M University
item Commins, Johm - Information Management Services, Inc
item Arab, Lenore - University Of California
item Baer, David
item Moler, James - Information Management Services, Inc
item Moshfegh, Alanna
item Neuhouser, Marian - Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
item Prentice, Ross - Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
item Rhodes, Donna
item Spiegelman, Donna - Harvard School Of Public Health
item Subar, Amy - National Cancer Institute (NCI, NIH)
item Tinker, Lesley - Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
item Willett, Walter - Harvard School Of Public Health
item Kipnis, Victor - National Cancer Institute (NCI, NIH)

Submitted to: American Journal of Epidemiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/28/2015
Publication Date: 11/1/2015
Citation: Freedman, L.S., Midthune, D., Carroll, R.J., Commins, J.M., Arab, L., Baer, D.J., Moler, J.E., Moshfegh, A.J., Neuhouser, M.L., Prentice, R.L., Rhodes, D.G., Spiegelman, D., Subar, A.F., Tinker, L.F., Willett, W., Kipnis, V. 2015. Application of a new statistical model for measurement error to the evaluation of dietary self-report instruments. American Journal of Epidemiology. 26(6):925-933.

Interpretive Summary: Most statistical methods that adjust analyses for dietary measurement error treat an individual’s usual intake as a fixed quantity. However, in reality usual intake, if defined as the average intake over a few months, it will vary over the course of a year or more. The objective was to describe a new model that accounts for usual dietary intake variation over the course of a year or longer and for the proximity of biomarker measurements to self-reports within the framework of a meta-analysis. The new model was applied to the analysis of data on energy, protein, potassium and sodium and their densities using recovery biomarkers as reference instruments from five large validation studies conducted between 1999-2009 on U.S. adult population groups. Using this model, we estimated attenuation factors and correlations with true longer-term usual intake for single and multiple 24 hour dietary recalls (24HRs) and food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and compared them with those obtained by the usual method. Compared to the usual method, the estimates using the time-varying model showed slightly larger values of the attenuation factor and correlation coefficient for FFQs and smaller values for 24HRs. With the new model, while four 24HRs had higher estimated correlations with truth than a single FFQ for absolute intakes of protein, potassium and sodium, for densities the correlations were approximately equal. Accounting for the time element in dietary validation is potentially important, and points towards the need for longer-term validation studies.

Technical Abstract: The objective was to describe a new model that accounts for usual dietary intake variation over the course of a year or longer and for the proximity of biomarker measurements to self-reports within the framework of a meta-analysis. The new model was applied to the analysis of data on energy, protein, potassium and sodium and their densities using recovery biomarkers as reference instruments from five large validation studies conducted between 1999-2009 on U.S. adult population groups. Using this model, we estimated attenuation factors and correlations with true longer-term usual intake for single and multiple 24 hour dietary recalls (24HRs) and food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and compared them with those obtained by the usual method. Compared to the usual method, the estimates using the time-varying model showed slightly larger values of the attenuation factor and correlation coefficient for FFQs and smaller values for 24HRs. In some cases, the difference between the usual estimate and new estimate for multiple 24HRs was substantial. With the new model, while four 24HRs had higher estimated correlations with truth than a single FFQ for absolute intakes of protein, potassium and sodium, for densities the correlations were approximately equal. Accounting for the time element in dietary validation is potentially important, and points towards the need for longer-term validation studies.