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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #311558

Research Project: IMPROVED RESISTANCE TO SOYBEAN PATHOGENS AND PESTS

Location: Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research

Title: Research advances and management of soybean sudden death syndrome

Author
item Hartman, Glen
item Chang, Hao-xun - University Of Illinois
item Leandro, Leonor - Iowa State University

Submitted to: Crop Protection Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/17/2015
Publication Date: 5/20/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/61836
Citation: Hartman, G.L., Chang, H., Leandro, L.F. 2015. Research advances and management of soybean sudden death syndrome. Crop Protection Journal. 73:60-66.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Fusarium virguliforme causes soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) in the United States. The disease was first observed in Arkansas in 1971, and since has been reported in most soybean-producing states, with a general movement from the southern to the northern states. In addition to F. virguliforme, four other species, F. brasiliense, F. crassistipitatum, F. cuneirostrum, and F. tucumaniae, have been reported to cause SDS in South America. Yield losses caused by F. virguliforme range from slight to 100%. Severely infected plants often have increased flower and pod abortion, reduced seed size, increased defoliation, and premature maturity. Foliar symptoms observed in the field are most noticeable from mid to late reproductive growth stages. Research to manage SDS includes studies on crop rotations, soil types, tillage practices, seed treatments, and on the development and utilization of host resistance. This review neither focuses on the other species known to cause SDS outside of the United States nor on other Fusarium species that infect soybean, but do not cause SDS. The last section covers future research in genetic engineering. It is our belief that genetically engineered soybean plants along with other traditional management options will be effective as integrated management technique to control SDS.