Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #311531

Research Project: Health Roles of Dietary Selenium in Obesity

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Integrated datasets characterize metabolic interactions between mouse’s colonic mucosa, colonic-cecal contents and feces

Author
item Zeng, Huawei
item Grapov, Dmitry - University Of California
item Jackson, Matthew - Hill'S Pet Nutrition
item Fahrmann, Johannes - University Of California
item Fiehn, Oliver - University Of California
item Combs, Gerald

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2015
Publication Date: 3/28/2015
Citation: Zeng, H., Grapov, D., Jackson, M.I., Fahrmann, J., Fiehn, O., Combs, G.F. 2015. Integrated datasets characterize metabolic interactions between mouse’s colonic mucosa, colonic-cecal contents and feces [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29:748.7.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces and colonic mucosa from mice fed a standard chow diet. We detected >270 small molecular weight metabolites by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time- of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF). Of that number 58 (21%) varied significantly between all three sample types, while 82 (30%) showed similar patterns in mucosa and feces, and 160 (58%) showed similar patterns in the colonic-cecal contents and either mucosa or feces. In these sample type comparisons, metabolic pathway enrichment analysis revealed that these detected 275-metabolites can be categorized into 28 biochemical pathways as defined by KEGG, and among which 14 pathways are common to all sample types. These results comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites in the colonic-cecal contents, feces and colonic mucosa in a healthy mouse model. This information provides the groundwork for investigating metabolic interactions in the gut.