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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #311424

Research Project: Epidemiology and Management of Pierce's Disease and Other Maladies of Grape

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research

Title: Host selection and adaptation are major driving forces shaping ALS Xylella fastidiosa population structure in the San Joaquin Valley of California

Author
item Lin, Hong
item Islam, Md Sajedul - Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS, USDA)
item Cabrera-la Rosa, Juan - Non ARS Employee
item Civerolo, Edwin - Retired ARS Employee
item Groves, Russell - University Of Wisconsin

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/6/2014
Publication Date: 12/15/2014
Citation: Lin, H., Islam, M., Cabrera-La Rosa, J., Civerolo, E.L., Groves, R.L. 2014. Host selection and adaptation are major driving forces shaping ALS Xylella fastidiosa population structure in the San Joaquin Valley of California. CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium, December 15-17, 2014, Sacramento, California. p.94.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) causes disease in many commercial crops including almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease in susceptible almond (Prunus dulcis). In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of Xf associated with ALS disease were evaluated. Strains from two almond production sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California were collected and analyzed with multiple locus DNA markers. The distribution of genotypes, combined with UPGMA and PCA analyses identified two major genetic clusters that were associated with cultivars ‘Sonora’ and ‘Nonpareil’ regardless of the year of study or location. These relationships suggest that host selection and adaptation are major driving forces that are shaping ALS Xf population structure in the San Joaquin Valley. This finding could provide insight into understanding pathogen adaptation and host selection in the context of ALS disease dynamics.