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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #310838

Research Project: Exotic and Emerging Plant Diseases of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Use of airborne inoculum detection for disease management decisions

Author
item Mahaffee, Walter - Walt

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/5/2014
Publication Date: 10/1/2014
Citation: Mahaffee, W.F. 2014. Use of airborne inoculum detection for disease management decisions. In: Gullino, M.L., Bonants, P.J.M., editors. Detection and Diagnostics of Plant Pathogens. New York, NY: Springer. p. 39-54.

Interpretive Summary: This chapter is a review of the use of knowledge of pathogen presence to help guide disease management decisions. However, For decades we have had the capacity to monitor presence of pathogens in individual fields and make management recommendations on this information. However, implementation on broad scale has been limited due to the costs and technical skill required to effectively monitor pathogen presence across large areas. Recent advances in nucleic acid detection technologies are showing promise in enabling field level implementation of inoculum detection and quantification to aid in disease management decisions. Over the past 7 years we have investigated the use various molecular approaches to monitor the presence of grape powdery mildew in commercial vineyards and time fungicide applications based on detection. We are also developing a Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection of grape powdery mildew that may be suitable for practitioner implementation.

Technical Abstract: Knowledge of inoculum presence has been used for decades to help guide disease management decisions. However, its implementation on broad scale has been limited due to the capital costs and technical skill required to effectively monitor pathogen presence across large areas. Recent advances in nucleic acid detection technologies are showing promise in enabling field level implementation of inoculum detection and quantification to aid in disease management decisions. Over the past 7 years we have investigated the use various molecular approaches to monitor the presence of Erysiphe necator in commercial vineyards and time fun-gicide applications based on detection. Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a robust method for the detection of DNA that may be suitable for practitioner implementation.