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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #310814

Research Project: Integrated Pest Management for Insect Pests of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Efficacy of commercially available predators, nematodes, and fungal entomopathogens for control of Drosophila suzukii

Author
item Woltz, Jessica - Oregon State University
item Donahue, Kelly
item Bruck, Denny - Dupont Pioneer Hi-Bred
item Lee, Jana

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/4/2014
Publication Date: 1/8/2015
Citation: Woltz, J.M., Donahue, K.M., Bruck, D.J., Lee, J.C. 2015. Efficacy of commercially available predators, nematodes, and fungal entomopathogens for control of Drosophila suzukii. Journal of Applied Entomology. doi: 10.1111/jen.12200.

Interpretive Summary: The recent arrival of the spotted wing drosophila, an invasive pest of small fruits and stone fruits, has resulted in increased production costs for growers and the need for additional insecticide applications. Commercially available natural enemies were evaluated for their potential use in controlling this pest including: the minute pirate bug predator (Orius insidiosus), rove beetle predator (Dalotia coriaria); various fungal sprays that target insects (Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana, and Paecilomyces fomosoroseus); and various nematode species that are applied in the soil that target insects (Heterhabditis bacteriophora, Steinernema feltiae sn, and S. carpocapsae). This group of natural enemies was chosen to target multiple life stages of spotted wing drosophila, as well as multiple locations in which infested fruit may be found. Of the cultured fungal preparations strains tested, only M. anisopliae significantly decreased pest survival, but it had low residual activity and no visible effect on pest fecundity. The minute pirate bug decreased pest survival in simple laboratory arenas but not on potted blueberries or bagged blueberry branches outdoors. The rove beetle did not decrease pest survival in infested blueberries. Very few pests treated with nematodes showed infection. Although none of the natural enemies tested were able to individually control the spotted wing drosophila, these and related natural enemies are present as part of the naturally-occurring community in agricultural fields, where they may contribute to pest suppression.

Technical Abstract: The recent arrival of Drosophila suzukii, an invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit with a wide host range, has resulted in increased production costs for growers and the need for additional insecticide applications. There are few effective organic insecticides for D. suzukii, and insecticide use in conventional farms may be disruptive to natural enemies, suggesting a need for effective biological control in this system. Commercially available natural enemies were evaluated for their potential use in augmentative releases, including: the predators Orius insidiosus Say and Dalotia coriaria Kraatz; the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana, and Paecilomyces fomosoroseus; and the entomopathogenic nematodes Heterhabditis bacteriophora Oswego, Steinernema feltiae sn and S. carpocapsae. This suite of natural enemies was chosen to target multiple D. suzukii life stages as well as multiple locations in which infested fruit may be found. Of the cultured fungal preparations strains tested, only M. anisopliae significantly decreased D. suzukii survival, but it had low residual activity and no effect on D. suzukii fecundity. O. insidiosus decreased D. suzukii survival in simple laboratory arenas but not on potted blueberries or bagged blueberry branches outdoors. D. coriaria did not decrease D. suzukii survival in infested blueberries. The nematodes tested showed low infection rates and were not able to affect D. suzukii survival. Although none of the natural enemies tested were able to individually control D. suzukii, these and related natural enemies are present as part of the endemic natural enemy community in agricultural fields, where they may contribute to D. suzukii suppression.