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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #310651

Title: Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi in horses by house flies

Author
item Barba, Marta - Auburn University
item Stewart, Allison - Auburn University
item Passler, Thomas - Auburn University
item Wooldridge, Anne - Auburn University
item Van Santen, Edzard - Auburn University
item Chamorro, Manuel - Auburn University
item Cattley, Russell - Auburn University
item Hathcock, Terri - Auburn University
item Hogsette, Jerome - Jerry
item Hu, Xing - Auburn University

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/7/2015
Publication Date: 3/27/2015
Citation: Barba, M., Stewart, A.J., Passler, T., Wooldridge, A.A., Van Santen, E., Chamorro, M.F., Cattley, R.C., Hathcock, T., Hogsette, Jr, J.A., Hu, X.P. 2015. Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi in horses by house flies. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 29:636-643.

Interpretive Summary: The route of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses remains undetermined, but insect transmission is suspected. Scientists from CMAVE and Auburn University looked at house flies as possible vectors. Three ponies were directly inoculated with C. pseudotuberculosis, 4 were exposed for 24 hours to 20 C. pseudotuberculosis-inoculated flies, and 1 negative control pony was exposed to non-inoculated flies. Ponies were examined daily for swelling, heat, pain, and drainage at the inoculation site. Clinical signs of local infection and positive cultures were observed in 100% exposed ponies and were absent in the negative control. House flies were confirmed as mechanical vectors of C.pseudotuberculosis.

Technical Abstract: The route of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses remains undetermined, but transmission by insects is suspected. Scientists from CMAVE and Auburn University investigated house flies (Musca domestica L.) as possible vectors. Three ponies were directly inoculated with C. pseudotuberculosis, 4 were exposed for 24 hours to 20 C. pseudotuberculosis-inoculated flies, and 1 negative control pony was exposed to non-inoculated flies. Ponies were examined daily for swelling, heat, pain, and drainage at the inoculation site. Clinical signs of local infection and positive cultures were observed in 7/7 exposed ponies and were absent in the negative control. House flies were confirmed as mechanical vectors of C.pseudotuberculosis.