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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Logan, Utah » Forage and Range Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #309689

Research Project: Develop Improved Plant Genetic Resources to Enhance Pasture and Rangeland Productivity in the Semiarid Regions of the Western U.S.

Location: Forage and Range Research

Title: Book title: Exotic brome grasses in arid and semi-arid ecosystems of the western US: causes, consequences, and management implications

Author
item Monaco, Thomas
item Hardegree, Stuart
item PELLANT, MIKE - Bureau Of Land Management
item BROWN, CYNTHIA - Colorado State University

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2015
Publication Date: 2/1/2016
Citation: Monaco, T.A., Hardegree, S.P., Pellant, M., Brown, C.S. 2016. Book title: Exotic brome grasses in arid and semi-arid ecosystems of the western US: causes, consequences, and management implications. Book Chapter. Springer, New York. 339-370.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Exotic invasive annual grass research and management in arid and semiarid ecosystems of the western US have historically focused on the outcome of efforts to reduce weed abundance. Given the current impact of invasive annual grasses and their continued spread in this region, we assessed components of experimental research and large-scale management efforts with the goal of defining the need for greater integration between ecologically-based and adaptive management to reduce uncertainty in choosing management tools for semiarid rangeland systems. We present two case studies: (i) an assessment of research treatments to reduce Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass or downy brome) and assist the restoration of perennial grasses, and: (ii) an assessment of management efforts of the Bureau of Land Management to remediate landscapes impacted by B. tectorum invasion in the Great Basin region of the western US and strategies to improve sage-grouse (Centrocercus species) habitats. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of such research and management efforts, and suggest ways to refine management decisions and achieve stepwise improvements in ecosystem functioning.