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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: What We Eat in America - Dietary Survey: Data Collection, Interpretation, Dissemination, and Methodology

Location: Food Surveys Research Group

Title: Dietary fiber intake of the U.S. population, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010

Author
item Hoy, M Katherine
item Goldman, Joseph

Submitted to: Worldwide Web Site: Food Surveys Research Group
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/17/2014
Publication Date: 10/28/2014
Citation: Hoy, M.K., Goldman, J.D. 2014. Dietary fiber intake of the U.S. population, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010. Worldwide Web Site: Food Surveys Research Group. Available: www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=19476.

Interpretive Summary: Dietary fiber is important for gastrointestinal health. Available evidence suggests that an increased intake of dietary fiber may be beneficial for managing weight, improving blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Most individuals do not meet the Institute of Medicine Adequate Intake recommendations, and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans identifies dietary fiber as a nutrient to be increased in the diet. Using nationwide data on dietary intakes from What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010, data on dietary fiber intake of the U.S. population is reported, and food categories that contribute to dietary fiber intake of the population are highlighted. Data show the average dietary fiber intake of the population was 16 grams per day. Dietary fiber intakes of males overall were higher than intakes of females; however, when intake per 1,000 kcal is considered, intakes of females overall were higher than males. Food categories that contribute to dietary fiber intake include fruits and vegetables, and grains, such as breads, rolls and tortillas.

Technical Abstract: The purpose of this report is to present data on the dietary fiber intake of the U.S. population and the food categories that contribute to total intake. The dietary intake data were from a twenty-four hour recall provided by 9,042 individuals ages two and older, except breast-fed children, who participated in What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010. Data show that in 2009-2010 the average dietary fiber intake of the U.S. population was 16 grams per day. Dietary fiber intakes of males overall were higher than females, but when considered per 1,000 kcal, intakes of females overall were higher. Dietary fiber intake is related to energy intake and the higher overall intake of males is most likely related to higher energy intake. However, some foods contain more dietary fiber compared to others, thus the higher overall intake per 1,000 kcal of females may be related to food choices. In light of the potential health benefits of meeting Adequate Intake recommendations, data indicates that most Americans would benefit by increasing intake of foods high in dietary fiber. Vegetables and fruits contributed over one-third to dietary fiber intake, each accounting for 16% and 12%, respectively. Grains in breads, rolls, and tortillas provided 12% of total dietary intake of fiber, and other grains and grain products such as grain-based mixed dishes and cereals provided 9% and 8%, respectively. The information in this report is informative for health professionals, educators, and others who are interested in the dietary intake of the U.S. population. It is also useful to those who are developing education programs and policy initiatives to promote healthy food choices and for monitoring changes in dietary fiber intake within the population at large.

Last Modified: 09/24/2017
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