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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #308930

Research Project: CLASSICAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECT PESTS OF CROPS, EMPHASIZING TARNISHED PLANT BUG, SOYBEAN APHID, AND BROWN MARMORATED STINK BUG

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Invasion biology of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities

Author
item Asplen, Mark - Metropolitan State University
item Anfora, Gianfranco - Fondazione Edmund Mach
item Biondi, Antonio - University Of Catania
item Choi, Deuk-soo - Animal, Plant And Fisheries Quarantine And Inspection Agency (QIA)
item Chu, Dong - Qingdao Agricultural University
item Daane, Kent - University Of California
item Gibert, Patricia - National Council For Scientific Research-Cnrs
item Gutierrez, Andrew - University Of California
item Hoelmer, Kim
item Hutchison, William - University Of Minnesota
item Isaacs, Rufus - Michigan State University
item Jiang, Zhi-lin - Yunnan University
item Karpati, Zsolt - Hungarian Academy Of Sciences
item Kimura, Masahito - Hokkaido University
item Pascual, Marta - University Of Barcelona
item Philips, Christopher - University Of Minnesota
item Plantamp, Christophe - National Council For Scientific Research-Cnrs
item Ponti, Luigi - University Of California
item Vetek, Gabor - University Of Budapest
item Vogt, Heidrum - Julius Kuhn Institute
item Walton, Vaughan - Oregon State University
item Yu, Yi - Shandong Academy Of Agricultural Sciences
item Zappala, Lucia - University Of Catania
item Desneux, Nicolas - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)

Submitted to: Journal of Pest Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/24/2015
Publication Date: 7/2/2015
Citation: Asplen, M.K., Anfora, G., Biondi, A., Choi, D., Chu, D., Daane, K.M., Gibert, P., Gutierrez, A.P., Hoelmer, K.A., Hutchison, W.D., Isaacs, R., Jiang, Z., Karpati, Z., Kimura, M.T., Pascual, M., Philips, C.R., Plantamp, C., Ponti, L., Vetek, G., Vogt, H., Walton, V.M., Yu, Y., Zappala, L., Desneux, N. 2015. Invasion biology of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities. Journal of Pest Science. 88:469-494. DOI: 10.1007/s10340-015-0681-z.

Interpretive Summary: The invasive Asian vinegar fly (spotted-wing Drosophila or SWD) has emerged as an important insect pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe since the late 2000’s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over the past 5 years, new insights may be gained by reviewing research across the areas affected by SWD. We explore common themes in the invasion biology of SWD by examining: (1) its biology and current pest status in native and invaded regions; (2) the development of predictive models for its geographic expansion; and (3) prospects for biological control of SWD in invaded habitats, with emphasis on the role of parasitic wasps. Particularly fruitful areas for further research include studies of its overwintering, host-use, and dispersal capabilities; and applied studies of cost-effective alternative management techniques to complement conventional insecticide use within an IPM framework. Outreach and extension efforts will be critical to effective SWD pest management by highlighting successful strategies in various geographic regions.

Technical Abstract: The Asian vinegar fly species Drosophila suzukii (spotted-wing Drosophila or SWD) has emerged as an important invasive insect pest of small and stone fruits in both the Americas and Europe since the late 2000’s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over the past 5 years, important new insights may be gained in comparing and contrasting findings across areas affected by SWD. In this review, we explore common themes in the invasion biology of SWD by examining: (1) its biology and current pest status in endemic and recently invaded regions; (2) current efforts and future research needs for the development of predictive models for its geographic expansion; and (3) prospects for both natural and classical (= importation) biological control of SWD in invaded habitats, with emphasis on the role of hymenopteran parasitoids. We conclude that particularly fruitful areas of research include fundamental studies of its overwintering, host-use, and dispersal capabilities; as well as applied studies of alternative, cost-effective management techniques to complement conventional insecticide use within the integrated pest management framework. Finally, we emphasize that outreach and extension efforts are critical to effective SWD pest management by highlighting successful strategies, and insights gained, from various geographic regions.