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Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF INSECTS THAT ATTACK HORTICULTURAL, TURF, AND NURSERY CROPS

Location: Application Technology Research

Title: Insecticides evaluated as regulatory immersion treatments to eliminate third-instar Japanese beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from small-diameter field-grown nursery plants

Author
item OLIVER, JASON - Tennessee State University
item Reding, Michael - Mike
item Ranger, Christopher
item KLEIN, MICHAEL - The Ohio State University
item YOUSSEF, NADEER - Tennessee State University
item MOYSEENKO, JAMES - The Ohio State University
item DENNIS, SAMUEL - Tennessee State University

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/26/2015
Publication Date: 1/15/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/63346
Citation: Oliver, J., Reding, M.E., Ranger, C.M., Klein, M., Youssef, N., Moyseenko, J., Dennis, S. 2016. Insecticides evaluated as regulatory immersion treatments to eliminate third-instar Japanese beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from small-diameter field-grown nursery plants. Journal of Entomological Science. 51:9-28.

Interpretive Summary: Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica Newman, are a quarantine issue for nursery shipments to certain U.S. states. The Domestic Japanese Beetle Harmonization Plan (DJHP) allows balled and burlapped (B&B) root ball immersion in the insecticides chlorpyrifos or bifenthrin in order for trees to be certified for shipping. In order to identifying additional chemical control options, the objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate multiple insecticides as regulatory treatments against larvae of the Japanese beetles and 2) to determine the lowest effective rates that provide adequate control. Field tests were performed fall and spring from 2003 to 2007. All insecticide treatments reduced larval numbers compared to the untreated control trees, except for chlorantraniliprole and the lowest rate of trichlorfon in a fall test. The most effective insecticides were bifenthrin, bifenthrin + imidacloprid, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, clothianidin, and trichlorfon. However, acephate, cyfluthrin + imidacloprid, deltamethrin, imidacloprid, and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments did not control larvae below regulatory levels. Carbaryl, chlorantraniliprole, cyfluthrin + imidacloprid, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, and trichlorfon dips were more effective in spring than fall tests. The only insecticide that caused significant plant mortality was trichlorfon. Several insecticides that are effective at controlling larvaal Japanese beetles tested as part of the current experiment are not currently approved for use in the DJHP. Results from this multi-year study demonstrated that reduced rates of bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos demonstrated suitability for regulatory programs against P. japonica.

Technical Abstract: Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica Newman, are a quarantine issue for nursery shipments to certain U.S. states. The Domestic Japanese Beetle Harmonization Plan (DJHP) allows balled and burlapped (B&B) root ball immersion in chlorpyrifos or bifenthrin for P. japonica certification. Study objectives were 1) to evaluate multiple insecticides as potential regulatory dips against third instar P. japonica in 30-cm B&B and 2) to determine the lowest effective rates. Tests were performed fall and spring from 2003 to 2007. All insecticide treatments reduced larval numbers compared to the untreated check treatment, with the exception of chlorantraniliprole and the lowest rate of trichlorfon in a fall test. Bifenthrin, bifenthrin + imidacloprid, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, clothianidin, and trichlorfon were the most effective insecticides. Larval numbers in acephate, cyfluthrin + imidacloprid, deltamethrin, imidacloprid, and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments exceeded DJHP requirements. Carbaryl, chlorantraniliprole, cyfluthrin + imidacloprid, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, and trichlorfon dips were more effective in spring than fall tests. The only insecticide that caused significant plant mortality was trichlorfon (rates = 119.8 g AI 100 L -1). Several insecticides not currently approved for use in the DJHP and reduced rates of DJHP approved bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos demonstrated suitability for regulatory programs against P. japonica.