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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #308738

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: The spruce shoot gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): Piceacecis, a new genus for a non-native pest of Norway spruce from Europe and its native American relative

Author
item GAGNE, R. - Retired ARS Employee
item GRANEY, L. - Bartlett Tree Company

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/20/2014
Publication Date: 12/15/2015
Citation: Gagne, R.J., Graney, L. 2015. The spruce shoot gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): Piceacecis, a new genus for a non-native pest of Norway spruce from Europe and its native American relative. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 116(4):378-393.

Interpretive Summary: A gall midge was recently found causing previously unknown damage to shoots of Norway spruce in northeastern United States. Research into the identification of this pest showed that it was a newly arrived, non-native insect previously known only from Europe, a species that was relatively poorly known there. We properly redescribe all stages of the pest with illustrations, show how it differs from the one native North American species that is restricted to white spruce, and erect a new genus to include both species. This description, illustrations and key place the insect in scientific context and will allow correct identification of the damage and pest by foresters, planters and insect control specialists.

Technical Abstract: Dasineura abietiperda (Henschel), a European pest of Norway spruce, Picea abies (Pinaceae), is reported as new to North America. Damage symptoms are illustrated and an outline of its biology is given. A new genus, Piceacecis Gagné is described to include it and its North American relative, Phytophaga tsugae (Felt) that occurs on native American white spruce, Picea glauca. Both cecidomyiids are redescribed with illustrations. Both species are new combinations in Piceacecis and Phytophaga piceae (Felt) is a new junior synonym of P. tsugae.