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Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHOLOGIES & STRATEGIES FOR ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PERENNIAL TROPICAL CROPS IMP. TO THE US, .. COFFEE

Location: Sustainable Perennial Crops Laboratory

Title: Natural parasitism of Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) on the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, in Chiapas, Mexico

Author
item Perez, Jeanneth
item Infante, Francisco
item Poinar, George
item Vega, Fernando

Submitted to: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/22/2014
Publication Date: 2/9/2015
Citation: Perez, J., Infante, F., Poinar, G., Vega, F.E. 2015. Natural parasitism of Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) on the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, in Chiapas, Mexico. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 25:608-612.

Interpretive Summary: The coffee berry borer is the most devastating pest of coffee throughout the world and causes millions of dollars in losses each year. Biologically based insect pest management using nematodes reduces damage to crops and saves farmers time and money. In this paper we report on the coffee berry borer infection levels in a coffee growing area in Mexico with the nematode species Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi. This information will be of use to coffee scientists, entomologists, and the coffee industry.

Technical Abstract: Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi is a relatively new nematode species found attacking the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, in Mexico. We assessed the natural parasitism and distribution of this nematode in 20 coffee plantations in the state of Chiapas, at elevations ranging from 223 to 1458 meters above sea level. Coffee berries infested with the coffee berry borer were randomly collected from the plant and from the ground every three months for one year. A total of 23,568 coffee berry borer adults were dissected in the laboratory to assess for the presence of parasitic nematodes. A total of 178 adult female coffee berry borers and one adult male were infected with M. hypothenemi, for a 0.76% parasitism rate. Nevertheless, the nematode was present in 60% of the coffee plantations and at different elevations. Although the low level of parasitism is not encouraging, the nematode is another natural enemy, in addition to fungal entomopathogens and parasitoids, which limits the population growth of the coffee berry borer in Mexico.