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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #307711

Research Project: Management of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research

Title: Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) germplasm for non-burn seed production

Author
item JOHNSTON, W - Washington State University
item Johnson, Richard
item GOLOB, C - Washington State University
item DODSON, K - Washington State University
item SILBERNAGEL, D - Washington State University
item STAHNKE, G - Washington State University

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/13/2013
Publication Date: 1/1/2014
Citation: Johnston, W.J., Johnson, R.C., Golob, C.T., Dodson, K.L., Silbernagel, D.D., Stahnke, G.K. 2014. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) germplasm for non-burn seed production. p 43-48. In: Rakshit, A., editor. Technological advancement for vibrant agriculture. Athens, Greece:Atiner. p.43-48.

Interpretive Summary: A ban on open-field burning of post-harvest residue of grass seed production fields has been implemented in Washington, and restrictions are in place in Idaho and Oregon, USA. Our previous research showed that without post-harvest burning of residue, bluegrass seed yield decreased over time (Johnson et al., 2003). This has forced grass seed growers in the Pacific Northwest to use shorter rotations to maintain economically viable seed yields. What are needed are bluegrasses that will maintain high seed yield over several years without field burning of post-harvest residue. In a multi-year study we previously identified germplasm that had improved seed production without burning (Johnston, 2000). This germplasm needs long-term seed yield trials and turfgrass evaluations. Ultimately, bluegrasses that can be successfully grown for multiple harvests without burning will be released to grass seed growers in the Pacific Northwest, USA.

Technical Abstract: A ban on open-field burning of post-harvest residue of grass seed production fields has been implemented in Washington, and restrictions are in place in Idaho and Oregon, USA. Our previous research showed that without post-harvest burning of residue, bluegrass seed yield decreased over time (Johnson et al., 2003). This has forced grass seed growers in the Pacific Northwest to use shorter rotations to maintain economically viable seed yields. What are needed are bluegrasses that will maintain high seed yield over several years without field burning of post-harvest residue. In a multi-year study we previously identified germplasm that had improved seed production without burning (Johnston, 2000). This germplasm needs long-term seed yield trials and turfgrass evaluations. Ultimately, bluegrasses that can be successfully grown for multiple harvests without burning will be released to grass seed growers in the Pacific Northwest, USA.