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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety and Processing Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #307439

Title: Seroprevalence in chickens against Campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) in selected areas of the United States

Author
item Yeh, Hung-Yueh
item Hiett, Kelli
item Line, John - Eric
item JAGNE, JARRA - Cornell University - New York
item LAUER, DALE - University Of Minnesota

Submitted to: Zoonoses and Public Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/17/2015
Publication Date: 11/25/2015
Citation: Yeh, H., Hiett, K.L., Line, J.E., Jagne, J.F., Lauer, D.C. 2015. Seroprevalence in chickens against Campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) in selected areas of the United States. Zoonoses and Public Health. 63(4):265-70. doi: 10.1111/zph.12237. epub 2015 Nov 25.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter jejuni is a causative pathogen of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Poultry products are regarded as a major source for infection. In this study we used the FliD protein to survey the prevalence of C. jejuni antibodies in chickens from two areas in U.S. A total of 394 samples was tested. Positive samples ranged from 7 to 100%, suggesting anti-FliD antibodies were prevalent in the poultry population, and chickens had been exposed to C. jejuni.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Poultry products are regarded as a major source for human infection with this microorganism. We have demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) of C. jejuni is highly homologous among strains/isolates of this microorganism, and is antigenic as analyzed by immunoblot in broiler chickens. In this study we used the FliD protein as a probe to survey the prevalence of antibodies against C. jejuni in chickens, broilers and layers, from two areas in the U.S. A total of 394 serum samples was tested by immunoblot analysis. Positive serum samples ranged from 7 to 100%. Sera from layer breeders, 44-52 weeks of age, from the north Atlantic area, tested 100% positive, while four to six-week broilers, originating from 22 premises in the upper Midwest showed 7-100% positive. These results indicate that the anti-Campylobacter FliD antibodies in chickens were prevalent in the poultry population, suggesting that chickens had been exposed to C. jejuni (but not just as a commensal in chicken guts) and developed antibodies against this microorganism. Further, these results provide a rationale for evaluating whether this flagellar capping protein might be an efficacious vaccine candidate for the reduction of Campylobacter spp. in poultry, thus providing safer poultry products for human consumption.