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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306980

Research Project: METABOLOMIC AND MICROBIAL PROFILING OF TROPICAL/SUBTROPICAL FRUITS AND SMALL FRUITS FOR QUALITY FACTORS AND MICROBIAL STABILITY

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Physiology and quality of fresh-cut produce in CA/MA storage

Author
item Izumi, Hidemi - Kinki University
item Rodov, Victor - Volcani Center (ARO)
item Bai, Jinhe
item Wendakoon, Sumithra - Toyo University

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/8/2016
Publication Date: 8/2/2016
Citation: Izumi, H., Rodov, V., Bai, J., Wendakoon, S. 2016. Physiology and quality of fresh-cut produce in CA/MA storage. Book Chapter. Chapter 7, pages 253-305. In: Pareek, S., editor. Fresh-cut fruits and vegetables: Technology, Physiology and Safety. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis.

Interpretive Summary: Due to the mechanical processes of peeling, slicing and/or cutting, fresh-cut fruits and vegetables are susceptible to quality deterioration and microbial spoilage. The deterioration is usually accompanied with decrease of nutritional values. Controlled atmosphere (CA) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low oxygen and high carbon dioxide are beneficial in maintaining the quality of fresh-cut produce and reducing microbial growth for spoilage. The atmospheres, particularly low oxygen, also improve the preservation of antioxidant capacity, and vitamins such as ascorbic acid and carotenoids in fresh-cut produce.

Technical Abstract: Fresh-cut fruits and vegetables have exposed injured tissues due to the mechanical processes of peeling, slicing and/or cutting. Such processing consequently renders the produce highly susceptible to physiological breakdown and microbial spoilage. Product deterioration is usually accompanied with phytonutrient degradation. The physiological and microbiological activities individually or interactively affect the shelf life of fresh-cut produce. Wounding results in enzymatic browning of cut surfaces presumably involved in antimicrobial defense but worsening produce appearance. Bacterial contamination enhances the elicitation of phenolic compounds and subsequent browning of cut lettuce. The shelf life of fresh-cut produce is also limited by the loss of organoleptic and sensory quality such as color, texture, aroma, and taste. The conventional CA/MAP with low O2 and high CO2 has been shown to be beneficial in maintaining the quality of fresh-cut produce by reducing respiration rates, ethylene responses, water loss, enzymatic browning, and microbial growth for spoilage. The atmospheres, particularly low O2, also improve the preservation of antioxidant capacity, vitamins such as ascorbic acid and carotenoids, and phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and anthocyanins in fresh-cut produce.