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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Crop Genetics and Breeding Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306730

Research Project: Development of Peanut Germplasm with Improved Yield, Oil Quality, and Tolerance to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Photoperiod and growing degree days effect on dry matter partitioning in Jerusalem artichoke

Author
item Ruttanaprasert, R - Khon Kaen University
item Jogloy, S - Khon Kaen University
item Vorasoot, N - Khon Kaen University
item Kesmala, T - Khon Kaen University
item Kanwar, R - Iowa State University
item Holbrook, Carl - Corley
item Patanothai, A - Khon Kaen University

Submitted to: International Journal of Plant Production
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2013
Publication Date: 10/15/2013
Citation: Ruttanaprasert, R., Jogloy, S., Vorasoot, N., Kesmala, T., Kanwar, R.S., Holbrook Jr, C.C., Patanothai, A. 2013. Photoperiod and growing degree days effect on dry matter partitioning in Jerusalem artichoke. International Journal of Plant Production. 7:393-415.

Interpretive Summary: Jerusalem artichoke is an under-utilized crop native to North America. Inulin is a form of carbohydrate stored in Jerusalem artichoke tubers instead of starch which is stored in most tuber and root crops. Inulin is beneficial to human health as it is not digested in the digestive system and, therefore, functions as a soluble fiber. Jerusalem artichoke is the best candidate for inulin production in the tropics, where artichoke and chicory (the other inulin containing crops) cannot be grown commercially. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of growing degree days and photoperiod on dry matter and dry matter partitioning of different Jerusalem artichoke genotypes. Differences in temperature and photoperiod for growth, development and maturity was created by planting Jerusalem artichoke at different dates during low temperature and short photoperiod thus giving a wide range of temperature from transplanting through maturity. Jerusalem artichoke plants grown during short photoperiod were smaller and produced larger tubers than those grown during long photoperiod. Since Jerusalem artichoke during short photoperiod had smaller plants, growing Jerusalem artichoke at higher plant populations with optimum density is highly recommended to increase tuber yield.

Technical Abstract: The effect of photoperiod and growing degree days (GDD) on dry matter and dry partitioning in Jerusalem artichoke was investigated during 2008-09 and 2009-10. Three Jerusalem artichoke genotypes (CN-52867, JA-89 and HEL-65) were planted in 15 day-intervals between with thirteen different dates (September 20 to March 20) at Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Jerusalem artichoke genotypes responded differently to varying planting dates for harvest index, shoot dry weight, leaf area, number of tubers and tuber size. Two genotypes, CN-52867 and JA-89, were significantly more productive on the planting date of 20 September and they also performed well on planting dates of 5 October to 20 March. Plants grown in long photoperiod with a high number of GDD produced shoot dry weight rather than greater number of harvestable tubers, while short photoperiod induced high partitioning of assimilates to harvestable tubers. Jerusalem artichoke plants grown during short photoperiod were smaller and produced larger tubers than those grown during long photoperiod. Tuber yield was relatively unchanged across planting dates. Since Jerusalem artichoke during short photoperiod had smaller plants, growing Jerusalem artichoke at higher plant population with optimum density is highly recommended to increase tuber yield. The information obtained in this study is extremely important for Jerusalem artichoke production and breeding in the tropical agro-climatic conditions such as in Thailand.