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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Renewable Product Technology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306720

Research Project: IMPROVING BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SUSTAINABLE FUELS AND CHEMICALS

Location: Renewable Product Technology Research

Title: Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans has antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus

Author
item Bischoff, Kenneth
item Leathers, Timothy
item Price, Neil
item Manitchotpisit, Pennapa - Rangsit University

Submitted to: Journal of Antibiotics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/5/2015
Publication Date: 4/15/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5642485
Citation: Bischoff, K.M., Leathers, T.D., Price, N.P.J., Manitchotpisit, P. 2015. Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans has antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus. Journal of Antibiotics. 68:642-645. doi: 10.1038/ja.2015.39.

Interpretive Summary: This research discovered that an oil produced by a fungus called Aureobasidium pullulans can preferentially inhibit the growth of disease-causing bacteria called Streptococcus. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance has decreased the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs to treat and prevent infectious disease, and therefore there is a need for antibiotic alternatives to maintain the health and welfare of animals. Oils from Aureobasidium pullulans were found to have antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus. The Aureobasidium antibacterial oil has application in the dairy, swine, and aquaculture industries and will benefit producers through the improvement of animal health.

Technical Abstract: Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans NRRL 50380 was tested for antibacterial activity. Liamocins inhibited growth of Streptococcus agalactiae, S. uberis, S. mitis, S. infantarius, and S. mutans, with minimum inhibitory concentrations from 20 'g/ml to 78 'g/ml. Enterococcus faecalis was less susceptible (MIC = 312 'g/ml), while Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had MICs > 1,250 'g/ml. Liamocins may be developed as a narrow spectrum antimicrobial agent that targets streptococcal pathogens.