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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306505

Research Project: PARASITIC BIODIVERSITY AND THE U.S. NATIONAL PARASITE COLLECTION

Location: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory

Title: Granulomatous pneumonia due to Spirocerca lupi in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central Brazil

Author
item BLUME, GUILHERME - University Of Brasilia
item JUNIOR, JANILDO - University Of Brasilia
item GARDINER, CHRIS - The Joint Pathology Center (JPC)
item Hoberg, Eric
item Pilitt, Patricia - Pat
item SILVESTRES, RAFAEL - University Of Brasilia
item SANT'ANA, FABIANO - University Of Brasilia

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/1/2014
Publication Date: 10/31/2014
Publication URL: http://doi: 10.1177/1040638714554442
Citation: Blume, G.R., Junior, J.L., Gardiner, C.H., Hoberg, E.P., Pilitt, P.A., Silvestres, R., Sant'Ana, F.J. 2014. Granulomatous pneumonia due to Spirocerca lupi in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central Brazil. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. 26(6):815-817.

Interpretive Summary: Developing an understanding of the potential influence of parasitism in free-ranging hosts depends on documentation of diversity (the species present) and pathological processes related to disease. Among wild canids of South America, there remains a paucity of knowledge about both aspects of parasitism. Among maned wolves there have been several studies of parasites, but none have documented the occurrence of the pathogenic Spirocerca lupi. Our report describes the anatomic pathology findings in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central-western region of Brazil and infections of S. lupi associated with granulomatous pneumonia. Microscopically, there was granulomatous inflammation with numerous intralesional sections of spirurid nematodes. Representative complete adult specimens of nematodes derived from these lesions were submitted for parasitological exam and morphologically identified as the spirurid S. lupi, a prominent nematode not previsouly known in these wild canids. Further epidemiologic and pathology studies are necessary to determine the pathogenesis and prevalence of S. lupi infection in maned wolves in the central-western region of Brazil. Molecular comparisons of nematodes from populations of S. lupi from various hosts and geographic localities may enhance our understanding of local or landscape level relationships within a broader global distribution for these important parasites of canids. Our study provides baseline data to wildlife biologists, disease ecologists and veterinarians about the previously unknown distribution of these nematodes in the region of Brazil.

Technical Abstract: This case report describes the anatomic pathology findings in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central-western region of Brazil presenting granulomatous pneumonia associated with intralesional infection by Spirocerca lupi. Both wolves had multiple, white, 1-1.5 cm in diameter, soft, encapsulated nodules in the caudal lung lobes, which contained nematodes on cut sections. Microscopically, there was granulomatous inflammation with numerous intralesional sections of spirurid nematodes. Representative complete adult specimens of nematodes derived from these lesions were submitted for parasitological exam and identified as the spirurid S. lupi. To the authors knowledge, this is the first report of granulomatous pneumonia due to S. lupi in maned wolves.