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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306117

Research Project: Impact of Early Dietary Factors on Child Development and Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Body composition from age 3 months to 6 years of children born to lean, overweight and obese mothers

Author
item ANDRES, ALINE - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item HULL, H - University Of Kansas
item SHANKAR, KARTIK - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item CLEVES, MARIO - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item CASEY, PATRICK - University Arkansas For Medical Sciences (UAMS)
item Badger, Thomas - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)

Submitted to: Annual Scientific Meeting NAASO, The Obesity Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/5/2014
Publication Date: 11/15/2014
Publication URL: http://obesityweek.com/app/uploads/2015/03/2014-TOS-Abstracts.pdf
Citation: Andres, A., Hull, H.R., Shankar, K., Cleves, M., Casey, P.H., Badger, T.M. 2014. [Poster#T-2323-P] Body composition from age 3 months to 6 years of children born to lean, overweight and obese mothers. Annual Scientific Meeting NAASO, The Obesity Society. http://obesityweek.com/app/uploads/2015/03/2014-TOS-Abstracts.pdf.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The association between higher maternal pre-gravid body mass index and greater risk of later life obesity in the offspring has been hypothesized to be mediated in part via developmental programming. However, most studies have relied on cross-sectional analyses and anthropometric data thus far. We prospectively investigated the association between self-reported maternal pre-gravid BMI and offspring body composition at ages 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 months in 328 mother-infant pairs while controlling for gestational age, birth weight, sex, race, and early infant feeding. Body composition was assessed using Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 450 with discovery upgrade, Bedford, MA) using the infant software (3-12 months) and the pediatric software (=24 months). Significant differences were found in fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), trunk FM, and peripheral FM among the three groups, demonstrating higher adiposity in offspring born to obese mothers throughout childhood (P<0.05). A strong sexually dimorphic effect emerged, demonstrating that boys (N=160) born to obese mothers have greater body adiposity (total and regional) and lower %FFM throughout the first 6 years life (P=0.0011); whereas, girls' (N=168) %FM and %FFM did not differ between the maternal BMI groups (P=0.2350). Results also suggest that boys born to obese mothers gain significantly greater adiposity after age 2 years compared to boys born to lean or overweight mothers. These data are consistent with numerous experimental studies demonstrating maternal programming has a stronger effect in male offspring.