Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #305871

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE FOODBORNE PATHOGENS IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Effects of Candida norvegensis live cells on in vitro oat straw rumen fermentation

Author
item Ruiz-barrera, Oscar - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Castillo-castillo, Yamicela - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Arzola-alvarez, Claudio - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Burrola, Eduviges - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Salinas, Jamie - University Of Tamaulipas
item Corral, Agustin - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Hume, Michael
item Murillo, Manuel - Juarez University Of The State Of Durango
item Itza, Mateo - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua

Submitted to: Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/2015
Publication Date: 2/1/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/63178
Citation: Ruiz, O., Castillo, Y., Arzola, C., Burrola, E., Salinas, J., Corral, A., Hume, M.E., Murillo, M., Itza, M. 2016. Effects of Candida norvegensis live cells on in vitro oat straw rumen fermentation. Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences. 29(2):211-218.

Interpretive Summary: This study evaluated the effect of yeast on the digestion of oat straw in cow stomach fluid (rumen fluid). Rumen fluid was incubated with or without (Control) yeast in beakers for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. Compared to Control without yeast, the addition of yeast caused the solution to become more acidic over time, while after 12 h on incubation, the numbers of yeast cells increased. There was also an increase in different types of biological acids produced. These acids can be used by the cow for energy and as a usable food source. These results demonstrated that yeast in rumen fluid had a favorable effect on digestion of oat straw. The results demonstrated the potential of yeast as a feed additive to increase the feed use potential of oat straw in dairy production. This information is of interest to producers and researchers seeking feed additive alternatives to antibiotics to enhance production in beef and dairy cattle.

Technical Abstract: This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. There was a decrease in lactic acid (quadratic, P=0.01), pH (quadratic, P=0.02), and yeasts counts (linear, P<0.01) across fermentation times. However, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and NH3-N increased across fermentation times (quadratic; P<0.01 and P<0.02, respectively). Addition of yeast cells caused a decrease in pH values compared over all fermentation times (P<0.01), and lactic acid decreased at 12 h (P=0.05); meanwhile, yeast counts increased (P=0.01) at 12 h. C. norvegensis increased ammonia-N at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h (P<0.01), and IVDMD of oat straw increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (P<0.01) of fermentation. Yeast cells increased acetate (P<0.01), propionate (P<0.03), and butyrate (P<0.03) at 8 h, while valeriate and isovaleriate increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (P<0.01). The yeast did not affect cellulolytic bacteria (P=0.05), but cellulolytic fungi increased at 4 and 8 h (P<0.01), and production of methane decreased (P<0.01) at 8 h.