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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sunflower and Plant Biology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #305368

Research Project: Sunflower Genetic Improvement with Genes from Wild Crop Relatives and Domesticated Sunflower

Location: Sunflower and Plant Biology Research

Title: Registration of cytoplasmic male-sterile oilseed sunflower genetic stocks CMS GIG2 and CMS GIG2-RV, and fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV

Author
item FENG, JIUHUAN - North Dakota State University
item LIU, ZHAO - North Dakota State University
item Seiler, Gerald
item Jan, Chao-Chien

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/7/2014
Publication Date: 12/19/2014
Citation: Feng, J., Liu, Z., Seiler, G.J., Jan, C.C. 2015. Registration of cytoplasmic male-sterile oilseed sunflower genetic stocks CMS GIG2 and CMS GIG2-RV, and fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV. Journal of Plant Registrations. 9:125-127. DOI:10.3198/jpr2014.050029crgs.

Interpretive Summary: Sunflower is the fifth most important oil-producing crop worldwide. Currently, hybrid sunflower production is solely dependent on a single female parent CMS PET1, derived from a wild prairie sunflower developed in 1969. This leaves sunflower very vulnerable to attack by pathogens similar to the disaster seen in corn in the 1970s. The wild sunflowers are a potential source of new cytoplasm that could be used as a female parent. Alternative female and male breeding lines are needed in sunflower breeding programs to prevent this disaster in sunflower due to the ever changing environmental stresses and diseases. However, sunflower breeders are often reluctant to explore the use of new lines from wild species due to the time-consuming effort to produce adapted cultivated lines. A newly identified female line, CMS GIG2, derived from a wild perennial sunflower and an associated male line are clearly different from the currently used CMS PET1 cytoplasm and the male lines. The new combination could be used to substitute for the older CMS PET1 cytoplasm currently used in hybrid sunflower production. Additionally, closely linked molecular markers were discovered for the male line that can be used to speed up the breeding process, facilitating marker-assisted selection. The new CMS and male fertility restoration line will provide alternative source for parental line development for hybrid sunflower production.

Technical Abstract: Two cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genetic stocks, CMS GIG2 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and CMS GIG2-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and corresponding fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx) and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx) developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station were released in December 2013. CMS GIG2 was derived from an interspecific cross between Helianthus giganteus accession 1934 and H. annuus cv. HA 89, with the corresponding fertility restoration gene Rf4 derived from an amphiploid of NMS HA 89 x H. maximiliani 1631. CMS GIG2 and its restoration gene were developed in an HA 89 background through recurrent backcross and single plant selection techniques. CMS GIG2-RV and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV produce plants with reduced vigor (RV) due to the loss of vigor restoration genes through backcrossing with HA 89. The CMS and fertility restoration lines are in the widely used cultivated line HA 89. Fertility restoration is controlled by a single dominant gene, Rf4. Tightly linked SSR markers, ORS 13 and ORS 1114, cosegregated with the Rf4 locus, while STS 10B1 mapped 3.1 cM from the Rf4 locus will facilitate marker-assisted selection in sunflower breeding. The CMS and RF lines will provide an alternative source for parental line development for hybrid sunflower production.