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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #305048

Research Project: Enhanced Disease and Abiotic Stress Resistance in Edible Legumes

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Performance of Andean common bean under low fertility stress in Tanzania

Author
item Mndolwa, Eninka - Washington State University
item Nchimbi-msolla, Susan - Sokoine University Of Agriculture
item Edward, Straton - Sokoine University Of Agriculture
item Miklas, Phillip - Phil

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/11/2014
Publication Date: 3/1/2014
Citation: Mndolwa, E., Nchimbi-Msolla, S., Edward, S., Miklas, P.N. 2014. Performance of Andean common bean under low fertility stress in Tanzania. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 57: 89-90.

Interpretive Summary: Low soil fertility is a limiting factor for bean production in East Africa. In Tanzania low available N and P soils are widespread. Average bean yields in Tanzania are around 500 kg/ha although the potential yield under reliable rain-fed conditions is 1500–3000kg/ha, using improved varieties and proper crop and land husbandry. A major reason for poor performance of the local landraces grown by many smallholders is susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses. Biotic constraints include diseases, insect pests and weeds. Abiotic constraints include drought and high temperatures and low fertility soils (Hillock, et al., 2006). Bean production on degraded soils is increasing. An affordable means for small scale farmers to improve bean productivity may be the use of low fertility stress tolerant varieties (Lunze, et al.,2007).Our goal was to identify Andean lines for use in breeding new cultivars with low fertility stress tolerance for smallholder farmers in East Africa.

Technical Abstract: Low soil fertility is a limiting factor for bean production in East Africa. In Tanzania low available N and P soils are widespread. Average bean yields in Tanzania are around 500 kg/ha although the potential yield under reliable rain-fed conditions is 1500–3000kg/ha, using improved varieties and proper crop and land husbandry. A major reason for poor performance of the local landraces grown by many smallholders is susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses. Biotic constraints include diseases, insect pests and weeds. Abiotic constraints include drought and high temperatures and low fertility soils (Hillock, et al., 2006). Bean production on degraded soils is increasing. An affordable means for small scale farmers to improve bean productivity may be the use of low fertility stress tolerant varieties (Lunze, et al.,2007).Our goal was to identify Andean lines for use in breeding new cultivars with low fertility stress tolerance for smallholder farmers in East Africa.