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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #305000

Research Project: Enhancing Plant Resistance to Water-Deficit and Thermal Stresses in Economically Important Crops

Location: Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research

Title: Analyses of Fusarium wilt race 3 resistance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

Author
item Abdullaev, Alisher - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Salakhutdinov, Ilkhom - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Egamberdiev, Sharof - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Kuryazov, Zarif - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Glukhova, Ludmila - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Adilova, Azoda - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Rizaeva, Sofiya - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences
item Ulloa, Mauricio
item Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim - Uzbekistan Academy Of Sciences

Submitted to: Genetica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/9/2015
Publication Date: 5/15/2015
Citation: Abdullaev, A.A., Salakhutdinov, I.B., Egamberdiev, S.S., Kuryazov, Z., Glukhova, L.G., Adilova, A.T., Rizaeva, S.M., Ulloa, M., Abdurakhmonov, I.Y. 2015. Analyses of Fusarium wilt race 3 resistance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Genetica. 143(3):385-392.

Interpretive Summary: Fusarium wilt represents a serious threat to cotton production worldwide and is caused by a fungus [Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV]. At least eight genotypes of FOV, called races, have been described around the world. These races do not express similar modes of infection and FOV resistance significantly differs among FOV races for cotton cultivars. Integrating disease resistance into high-yielding cultivars with superior fiber quality is one of the most important objectives in cotton breeding programs. For the last decades, the FOV pathogen has become a significant problem in Uzbekistan causing severe wilt disease and yield losses of Upland (G. hirsutum L.) cultivars. Herein, we report for the first time, the first genetic analysis of FOV race 3 resistance. Results from genetic analyses indicated a recessive single gene action under high inoculum levels or disease pressure, and Uzbek germplasm may be more susceptible than expected to FOV race 3, and sources of resistance to FOV may be limited under the FOV inoculum levels present in highly-infested fields making the breeding process more complex.

Technical Abstract: In Uzbekistan, the most northern cotton country, as well as in many others worldwide, Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum (FOV) Atk. Sny & Hans] represents a serious threat to cotton (Gossypium spp.) production. At least eight genotypes of FOV, called races, have been described. These races do not express similar pathogenicity mechanisms, and the inheritance of FOV resistance significantly differs among FOV races for cotton genotypes. Integrating disease resistance into high-yielding cultivars with superior fiber quality is one of the most important objectives in cotton breeding programs. For the last decades, the FOV pathogen has become a significant problem in Uzbekistan causing severe wilt disease and yield losses of Upland (G. hirsutum L.) cultivars. Herein, we present the first genetic analyses of FOV race 3 resistance on Uzbek Cotton Germplasm with a series of field and greenhouse artificial inoculation-evaluations and inheritance studies. The field experiments were conducted in two different sites: the experimental station in Zangiota region - (Environment (Env) 1 and the Institute of Cotton Breeding (Env-2, Tashkent province). The Env-1 was known to be free of FOV while the Env-2 was known to be a heavily FOV infested soil. In both (Env-1 and Env-2) of these sites, field soil was inoculated with FOV race 3. F2 and an F3 Upland populations (“Mebane B1” x “11970”) were observed with a large phenotypic variance for plant survival and FOV disease severity within populations and among control or check Upland accessions. Wilt symptoms among studied F2 individuals and F3 families significantly differed depending on test type and evaluation site. Distribution of Mendelian rations of susceptible (S) and resistant (R) phenotypes were 1S:1R field Env-1 and 3S:1R field Env-2 in the F2 population, and 1S:3R greenhouse site in the F3 population. The different segregation distribution of the Uzbek populations may be explained by differences in FOV inoculum level and environmental conditions during assays. However, genetic analysis indicated a recessive single gene action under high inoculum levels or disease pressure for FOV race 3 resistance. Uzbek germplasm may be more susceptible than expected to FOV race 3, and sources of resistance to FOV may be limited under the FOV inoculum levels present in highly-infested fields making the breeding process more complex.