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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #304394

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Modeling optimal mineral nutrition for hazelnut micropropagation

Author
item HAND, CHARLES - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item MAKI, SHINYA - NIIHAMA NATIONAL COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY
item REED, BARBARA

Submitted to: Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/17/2014
Publication Date: 10/24/2014
Citation: Hand, C., Maki, S., Reed, B.M. 2014. Modeling optimal mineral nutrition for hazelnut micropropagation. Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture. 119:411-425. doi: 10.1007/s11240-014-0544-y.

Interpretive Summary: Micropropagation of hazelnut is typically difficult due to the wide variation in response among cultivars. This study was designed to overcome that difficulty by using computer modeling to determine the which mineral nutrients are most important. The mineral nutrients of the growth medium were separated into five groups with 33 treatments for use in modeling. The optimum shoot growth in response to mineral nutrients varied with the type of hazelnut, but indicated that nitrogen was important and increases in the trace nutrients were very important to overall quality and shoot length. Reduced nitrogen improved multiplication while higher amounts increased shoot length for most cultivars. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium in the plants that grew well were greater than poorly growing plants and control treatments. New growth medium recipes will require increases in most of the nutrients with options to change the types of nitrogen used.

Technical Abstract: Micropropagation of hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is typically difficult due to the wide variation in response among cultivars. This study was designed to overcome that difficulty by modeling the optimal mineral nutrients for micropropagation of C. avellana selections using a response surface design analysis. The Driver and Kuniyuki Walnut (DKW) mineral nutrients were separated into five factors: NH4NO3, Ca(NO3)2, mesos (MgSO4 and KH2PO4), K2SO4, and minor nutrients (B, Cu, Mn, Mo, and Zn) ranging from 0.5× to 2.0× the standard DKW concentrations with 33 treatments for use in modeling. The optimum shoot proliferation in response to mineral nutrients was genotype specific, but indicated that the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen (N) and increased total N, mesos and minors were important to overall quality and shoot length for all genotypes. Reduced Ca(NO3)2 improved multiplication while higher amounts increased shoot length for most cultivars. Uptake of nutrients from control treatments and those producing good and poor growth varied with the genotype. Concentrations of Ca and Mg in the plants that grew well were greater than poorly growing plants and control treatments. ‘Sacajawea’ had significantly higher K and Ca uptake in the good growth treatment compared to the control and the other genotypes. Much less Na was taken up by the plants on the good growth treatment compared to the poor one. New media formulations will require higher Ca(NO3)2, mesos and minors with possible changes in the ammonium and nitrate concentrations.