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ARS Home » Plains Area » Miles City, Montana » Livestock and Range Research Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303825

Research Project: Adaptive Rangeland Management of Livestock Grazing, Disturbance, and Climatic Variation

Location: Livestock and Range Research Laboratory

Title: An entomopathogenic fungus and nematode prove ineffective for biocontrol of an invasive leaf miner Profenusa thomsoni in Alaska

Author
item PROGAR, R - Us Forest Service (FS)
item KRUSE, J - Us Forest Service (FS)
item LUNDQUIST, J - Us Forest Service (FS)
item ZOGAS, K - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Rinella, Matthew - Matt

Submitted to: Biocontrol Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/13/2014
Publication Date: 12/6/2014
Citation: Progar, R.A., Kruse, J.J., Lundquist, J.E., Zogas, K.P., Rinella, M.J. 2014. An entomopathogenic fungus and nematode prove ineffective for biocontrol of an invasive leaf miner Profenusa thomsoni in Alaska. Biocontrol Science and Technology. 25(4):373-382. https://doi.org/10.1080/09583157.2014.977224.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09583157.2014.977224

Interpretive Summary: A nonnative invasive sawfly, the amber-marked birch leafminer has spread rapidly throughout south-central Alaska to occupy nearly! 00,000 ha. Impacts have been considered primarily aesthetic, because leafininers cause leaves to senesce prematurely, but there is also likely reduced tree growth and weakening of trees that renders them more vulnerable to other pest insects and diseases. We tested the ability of commercially available biological control agents to control the leafininer. A fungus and nematode biological control agent were applied in aqueous solution to the soil/litter surface in Alaska at one site in 2008 and 2009 and two sites in 20 II. There was no evidence the fungi or nematode controlled leafininers. Instead, there was evidence the fungi increased leafininer density at two sites, likely by reducing leafininer predators. As tested, B. bassiana and S. carpocapsae do not appear effective as biological controls for amber-marked birch leaf-miner.

Technical Abstract: A nonnative invasive sawfly, the amber-marked birch leafminer[Profenusa thomsoni (Konow)] has spread rapidly throughout south-central Alaska to occupy nearly 1OO,OOO ha. Impacts have been considered primarily aesthetic, because leafininers cause leaves to senesce prematurely, but there is also likely reduced tree growth and wealcening of trees that renders them more vulnerable to other pest insects and diseases. We tested the ability of commercially available biological control agents to control the leafininer. The entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin GHA strain and the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) were applied in aqueous solution to the soil/litter surface in Alaska at one site in 2008 and 2009 and two sites in 2011. There was no evidence the fungi or nematode controlled leafininers. Instead, there was evidence the fungi increased leafminer density at two sites, likely by reducing leafminer predators. As tested, B. bassiana and S. carpocapsae do not appear effective as biological controls for amber-marked birch leaf-miner.